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sudo conferred powers

with 3 comments

Coming from Solaris Unix and Red Hat Linux to Ubuntu, Mac OS X and other distributions of Linux was interesting a couple years ago. The fact that you couldn’t su to the root account was tedious. It didn’t take too long (a couple momentes) to recall that I could assume those privileges in a shell, like:

admin_user@machine_name:~$ sudo sh
#

Naturally, this avoids entering sudo before a series of commands and makes administering any box simpler. It should work on all distributions but I’ve not checked ALL of them because they’re too numerous anymore. I know it works on the Mac OS X, Ubuntu, and now Fedora distributions.

Today, I got a kick from the message provided by Fedora 10 when you assume root permissions. It’s been over 20 years since I got that lecture on an AT&T box at First Interstate Bank. I imagine that any equivalent box to that is in a museum, while that bank was acquired by Wells Fargo in the early 1990s. The message from Fedora is just too funny to pass on making a comment. Here’s the screen shot:

SuperUserPowers

Hope it brought a smile to some faces …

Written by maclochlainn

December 6th, 2009 at 12:59 pm

Posted in Linux,Mac,Ubuntu

3 Responses to 'sudo conferred powers'

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  1. I see that message a few times as I’ve got a few different unix accounts and get easily confused. When I see the ‘Respect’ message I know the account doesn’t have SUDO permissions so I can skip the password step.

    Incidentally, rather than sudo sh, I do a “sudo su” to get to root (as I also “sudo su otheruser” a lot too)

    gary

    6 Dec 09 at 3:43 pm

  2. Right, like this on Ubuntu (Version 9.0.4):

    mclaughlinm@mclaughlinm-ubuntu94:~$ sudo su - root
    [sudo] password for mclaughlinm: 
    root@mclaughlinm-ubuntu94:~#

    maclochlainn

    6 Dec 09 at 6:53 pm

  3. Likewise, it is not uncommon for me to get the “Respect Message” in Solaris 10 (minus item number three in the lecture) as I discover that I don’t have permissions to perform a given action (e.g., the sudo su action). However, because I am in the sudoers file, any failed password attempt just results in a “Sorry, try again.”

    Adam

    7 Dec 09 at 12:15 pm

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