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Archive for August, 2015

Using CALIBRATE_IO

without comments

Using Oracle’s Resource Manager requires you to understand the IO dynamics. The first step requires you to run the CALIBRATE_IO procedure from the DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER package.

Oracle provides some great examples about how to use the CALIBRATE_IO procedure of the DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER package in the Oracle Database Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference. The CALIBRATE_IO procedure returns the best answer when you provide a valid number of files, which you can capture by querying the V$ASM_DISK view.

The following code queries the view and assigns the value to a session level variable:

CLEAR BREAKS
CLEAR COLUMNS
CLEAR COMPUTES
 
VARIABLE files NUMBER
 
BEGIN
  SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT name) disks
  INTO :files
  FROM v$asm_disk;
END;
/

When you have the number of files, you can calibrate the IO with the following anonymous block. The query should always work but just in case the NVL function on line 9 assigns the default number of files.

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DECLARE
  lv_num_physical_disks BINARY_INTEGER; — v$asm_disk
  lv_max_latency BINARY_INTEGER := 10;
  lv_max_iops BINARY_INTEGER;
  lv_max_mbps BINARY_INTEGER;
  lv_actual_latency BINARY_INTEGER;
BEGIN
  /* Assign actual files to anonymous block variable. */
  lv_num_physical_disks := NVL(:files,2);
 
  /* Run the calibrate_io procedure. */
  DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER.CALIBRATE_IO(
      num_physical_disks => lv_num_physical_disks
    , max_latency => lv_max_latency
    , max_iops => lv_max_iops
    , max_mbps => lv_max_mbps
    , actual_latency => lv_actual_latency);
END;
/

You can query the results like this:

SELECT max_iops
,      max_mbps
,      max_pmbps
,      latency
,      num_physical_disks
FROM   dba_rsrc_io_calibrate;

It should show results like these:

MAX_IOPS MAX_MBPS MAX_PMBPS LATENCY NUM_PHYSICAL_DISKS
-------- -------- --------- ------- ------------------
    8894      443       294       9                 18

Hope this helps those using the CALIBRATE_IO procedure of the DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER package.

Written by maclochlainn

August 31st, 2015 at 8:59 pm

Free Oracle Tuning Book

with 2 comments

Quick Start Guide to Oracle Query TuningWho can resist a free Rich Nimeiec book on SQL Tuning? O.K., those who know everything can resist. If you’re like me, this is an opportunity to learn from Rich. Click on the book image or this link to get a free copy, or if you want to pay $10 for a copy click here to buy Quick Start Guide to Oracle Query Tuning: Tips for DBAs and Developers from Amazon.com.

The book is four chapters long, is a 129 pages in length, and is in a PDF format. The outline is:

  1. Query Tuning: Developer and Beginning DBA
  2. Query Tuning: Basics for DBAs and Developers
  3. Advanced Performance Tuning
  4. Tips for Tuning When You Have Everything Tuned

Enjoy reading it. His more comprehensive book is Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Performance Tuning Tips & Techniques (Oracle Press) and it’s $30, but it’s written for an advanced audience (more or less OCA or higher).

Written by maclochlainn

August 31st, 2015 at 11:24 am

Use an object in a query?

without comments

Using an Oracle object type’s instance in a query is a powerful capability. Unfortunately, Oracle’s SQL syntax doesn’t make it immediately obvious how to do it. Most get far enough to put it in a runtime view (a subquery in the FROM clause), but then they get errors like this:

SELECT	 instance.get_type()
         *
ERROR AT line 4:
ORA-00904: "INSTANCE"."GET_TYPE": invalid identifier

The problem is how Oracle treats runtime views, which appears to me as a casting error. Somewhat like the ORDER BY clause irregularity that I noted in July, the trick is complete versus incomplete syntax. The following query fails and generates the foregoing error:

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SELECT instance.get_type() AS object_type
,      instance.to_string() AS object_content
FROM  (SELECT dependent()AS instance
       FROM   dual);

If you add a table alias, or name, to the runtime view on line 4, it works fine:

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SELECT cte.instance.get_type() AS object_type
,      cte.instance.to_string() AS object_content
FROM  (SELECT dependent() AS instance
       FROM   dual) cte;

That is the trick. You use an alias for the query, which assigns the alias like a table reference. The reference lets you access instance methods in the scope of a query. Different columns in the query’s SELECT-list may return different results from different methods from the same instance of the object type.

You can also raise an exception if you forget the open and close parentheses for a method call to a UDT, which differs from how Oracle treats no argument functions and procedures. That type of error would look like this:

SELECT cte.instance.get_type AS object_type
       *
ERROR AT line 1:
ORA-00904: : invalid identifier

It is an invalid identifier because there’s no public variable get_type, and a method is only found by using the parenthesis and a list of parameters where they’re required.

The object source code is visible by clicking on the expandable label below.

As always, I hope this helps those solving problems.

Written by maclochlainn

August 22nd, 2015 at 5:23 pm