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MySQL Workbench on Fedora

with one comment

The early release of Fedora 20 disallowed installation of MySQL Workbench but the current version allows it. Almost like Tom Cruise’s Edge of Tomorrow without the drama. All you need to do is follow my earlier instructions for installing MySQL on Fedora 20. I’d check your kernel to know whether it’s supported. You can check that with this command:

<shell> uname -r

My Fedora is at the following version:

3.14.8-200.fc20.x86_64

Then, you can install MySQL Workbench with yum, like this:

<shell> sudo yum install mysql-workbench

It generates the following log file, and if you have Oracle 11g XE installed you can ignore the mime-type error:

Loaded plugins: langpacks, refresh-packagekit
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package mysql-workbench-community.x86_64 0:6.1.7-1.fc20 will be installed
--> Processing Dependency: libzip.so.2()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libvsqlitepp.so.3()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libtinyxml.so.0()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: liblua-5.1.so()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libgtkmm-2.4.so.1()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libgdkmm-2.4.so.1()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libctemplate.so.2()(64bit) for package: mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package compat-lua-libs.x86_64 0:5.1.5-1.fc20 will be installed
---> Package ctemplate.x86_64 0:2.2-5.fc20 will be installed
---> Package gtkmm24.x86_64 0:2.24.4-2.fc20 will be installed
---> Package libzip.x86_64 0:0.11.2-1.fc20 will be installed
---> Package tinyxml.x86_64 0:2.6.2-4.fc20 will be installed
---> Package vsqlite++.x86_64 0:0.3.13-3.fc20 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
 
Dependencies Resolved
 
================================================================================
 Package                    Arch    Version        Repository              Size
================================================================================
Installing:
 mysql-workbench-community  x86_64  6.1.7-1.fc20   mysql-tools-community   24 M
Installing for dependencies:
 compat-lua-libs            x86_64  5.1.5-1.fc20   updates                158 k
 ctemplate                  x86_64  2.2-5.fc20     fedora                 174 k
 gtkmm24                    x86_64  2.24.4-2.fc20  fedora                 748 k
 libzip                     x86_64  0.11.2-1.fc20  updates                 59 k
 tinyxml                    x86_64  2.6.2-4.fc20   updates                 49 k
 vsqlite++                  x86_64  0.3.13-3.fc20  updates                 58 k
 
Transaction Summary
================================================================================
Install  1 Package (+6 Dependent packages)
 
Total download size: 26 M
Installed size: 119 M
Is this ok [y/d/N]: y
Downloading packages:
(1/7): compat-lua-libs-5.1.5-1.fc20.x86_64.rpm              | 158 kB  00:01     
(2/7): ctemplate-2.2-5.fc20.x86_64.rpm                      | 174 kB  00:01     
(3/7): tinyxml-2.6.2-4.fc20.x86_64.rpm                      |  49 kB  00:00     
(4/7): gtkmm24-2.24.4-2.fc20.x86_64.rpm                     | 748 kB  00:01     
(5/7): vsqlite++-0.3.13-3.fc20.x86_64.rpm                   |  58 kB  00:00     
(6/7): libzip-0.11.2-1.fc20.x86_64.rpm                      |  59 kB  00:02     
(7/7): mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64.rpm    |  24 MB  00:08     
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total                                              2.9 MB/s |  26 MB  00:08     
Running transaction check
Running transaction test
Transaction test succeeded
Running transaction
  Installing : gtkmm24-2.24.4-2.fc20.x86_64                                 1/7 
  Installing : libzip-0.11.2-1.fc20.x86_64                                  2/7 
  Installing : vsqlite++-0.3.13-3.fc20.x86_64                               3/7 
  Installing : ctemplate-2.2-5.fc20.x86_64                                  4/7 
  Installing : compat-lua-libs-5.1.5-1.fc20.x86_64                          5/7 
  Installing : tinyxml-2.6.2-4.fc20.x86_64                                  6/7 
  Installing : mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64                7/7 
Error in file "/usr/share/applications/oraclexe-startdb.desktop": "Application/database" is an invalid MIME type ("Application" is an unregistered media type)
  Verifying  : tinyxml-2.6.2-4.fc20.x86_64                                  1/7 
  Verifying  : compat-lua-libs-5.1.5-1.fc20.x86_64                          2/7 
  Verifying  : ctemplate-2.2-5.fc20.x86_64                                  3/7 
  Verifying  : vsqlite++-0.3.13-3.fc20.x86_64                               4/7 
  Verifying  : mysql-workbench-community-6.1.7-1.fc20.x86_64                5/7 
  Verifying  : libzip-0.11.2-1.fc20.x86_64                                  6/7 
  Verifying  : gtkmm24-2.24.4-2.fc20.x86_64                                 7/7 
 
Installed:
  mysql-workbench-community.x86_64 0:6.1.7-1.fc20                               
 
Dependency Installed:
  compat-lua-libs.x86_64 0:5.1.5-1.fc20     ctemplate.x86_64 0:2.2-5.fc20       
  gtkmm24.x86_64 0:2.24.4-2.fc20            libzip.x86_64 0:0.11.2-1.fc20       
  tinyxml.x86_64 0:2.6.2-4.fc20             vsqlite++.x86_64 0:0.3.13-3.fc20    
 
Complete!

After successfully installing MySQL Workbench, you can launch it with the following command:

<shell> mysql-workbench

It should launch the following MySQL Workbench home page (click on it to see the full size image):

FedoraMySQLWorkbenchHome

Written by maclochlainn

September 13th, 2014 at 12:00 am

MySQL Insert from Query

with 4 comments

While working with an error that my students surfaced in the Oracle Database 12c, I blogged about the limit of using a subquery in an Oracle INSERT statement, and I discovered something when retesting it in MySQL. It was a different limitation. I was also surprised when I didn’t find any mention of it through a Google search, but then I may just not have the right keywords.

The original test case uses a subquery to create a multiple row result set for an INSERT statement. Unfortunately, I discovered that you can’t always embed a UNION or UNION ALL inside a subquery. At least, you can’t when you call the subquery inside an INSERT statement. For example, let’s create a DESTINATION table and then we’ll try to insert records with a query that fabricates a result set.

-- Drop the destination table.
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS destination;
 
-- Create the destination table.
CREATE TABLE destination
( destination_id    INT UNSIGNED
, destination_name  VARCHAR(30));

Now let’s try the subquery:

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INSERT INTO destination
( SELECT 1,'Sample1'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT 2,'Sample2' );

It raises the following error message:

ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'UNION ALL
  SELECT 2,'Sample2' )' at line 3

I wasn’t sure if I missed something. It turned out that I did. While you can put a subquery inside an INSERT statement, you can’t embed it inside a set of parentheses when it contains a UNION ALL set operator. Other statements work with or without parentheses.

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INSERT INTO destination
  SELECT 1,'Sample1'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT 2,'Sample2';

If somebody has any more to add, I look forward to reading it.

Written by maclochlainn

June 15th, 2014 at 12:19 am

Posted in MySQL,sql

Tagged with

Toad Freeware Page

without comments

While I posted how to install Toad for MySQL Freeware five years ago, I’m always surprised how few people know about it there and consistently updated and improved. You can download Toad for MySQL Freeware or Toad Freeware for Oracle, SQL Server, Sybase, or IBM DB2 at this web site.

MySQLToadHome

You can also download Toad Data Modeler Freeware Edition. Just two notes, while Toad for Oracle Freeware is an MSI file, Toad for MySQL Freeware is a zip file and limited to only a Windows install.

Written by maclochlainn

April 30th, 2014 at 1:46 am

A/UX, NeXTSTEP, & OS X

with 5 comments

One thing that gets tedious in the IT community and Oracle community is the penchant for Windows only solutions. While Microsoft does an excellent job in certain domains, I remain a loyal Apple customer. By the way, you can install Oracle Client software on Mac OS X and run SQL Developer against any Oracle Database server. You can even run MySQL Workbench and MySQL server natively on the Mac OS X platform, which creates a robust development platform and gives you more testing options with the MySQL monitor (the client software).

Notwithstanding, some Windows users appear to malign Apple and the Mac OS X on compatibility, but they don’t understand that it’s a derivative of the Research Unix, through BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution). This Unix lineage chart illustrates it well:

Screen Shot 2014-04-18 at 3.49.39 PM

I’m probably loyal to Apple because in the early 1990’s I worked on Mac OS 6, Mac OS 7, A/UX, NeXTSTEP, and AIX/6000 (Version 3) while working at APL (American President Lines) in Oakland, California. Back then, my desktop was a pricey Macintosh Quadra 950 and today I work on a pricey Mac Pro desktop. The Mac Pro lets me use VMware virtualize development environments for Oracle Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Fedora, and as you might guess Windows 7/8. My question to those dyed in the wool Microsoft users is simple, why would you choose a single user OS like Windows over a multi-user OS like Mac OS X?

Written by maclochlainn

April 18th, 2014 at 4:28 pm

Deprecated mysqli Functions

without comments

PHPDeprecation5_4

Having noticed the release of PHP 5.5.10 last week while I was speaking at UTOUG, I checked the deprecated mysqli functions web page. There weren’t any deprecated by 5.5. Unfortuantely, there were six mysqli functions deprecated in 5.3 and removed in 5.4. Unfortunately, many of my posted code examples use 5.2 or 5.3 where they would have worked. The deprecated mysqli functions are:

  • mysqli_bind_param
  • mysqli_bind_result
  • mysqli_client_encoding
  • mysqli_fetch
  • mysqli_param_count
  • mysqli_send_long_data

Unfortunately, that puts a lot of updates on my queue of things to do. I imagine it likewise imposes limits on those running commercially on PHP 5.3 or older that plan an upgrade.

It does remind me that I need to pay close attention to the deprecation of mysqli functions with each release. These are actually the largest change since PHP 5.0.

Written by maclochlainn

March 18th, 2014 at 12:28 pm

Posted in MySQL,mysqli,PHP

Tagged with , ,

Capture MySQL Foreign Keys

with one comment

Shantanu asked a follow-up question on my Cleanup a MySQL Schema post from last month. He wanted to know if there was a way to capture foreign keys before removing them. The answer is yes, but how you do it depends on whether the primary key is based on a surrogate key using an auto incrementing sequence of a natural key using descriptive columns.

You can capture foreign keys with a simple query when they’re determined by a single column value. However, this script creates ALTER statements that will fail when a table holds a multiple column foreign key value. The SELECT statement would look like this when capturing all foreign key values in a MySQL Server:

SELECT   CONCAT('ALTER TABLE',' ',tc.table_schema,'.',tc.table_name,' '
               ,'ADD CONSTRAINT',' fk_',tc.constraint_name,' '
               ,'FOREIGN KEY (',kcu.column_name,')',' '
               ,'REFERENCES',' ',kcu.referenced_table_schema,'.',kcu.referenced_table_name,' ' 
               ,'(',kcu.referenced_column_name,');') AS script
FROM     information_schema.table_constraints tc JOIN information_schema.key_column_usage kcu
ON       tc.constraint_name = kcu.constraint_name
AND      tc.constraint_schema = kcu.constraint_schema
WHERE    tc.constraint_type = 'foreign key'
ORDER BY tc.TABLE_NAME
,        kcu.column_name;

You would add a line in the WHERE clause to restrict it to a schema and a second line to restrict it to a table within a schema, like this:

AND      tc.table_schema = 'your_mysql_database'
AND      tc.table_name = 'your_table_name'

Unfortunately, when the primary and foreign keys involve two or more columns you require a procedure and function. The function because you need to read two cursors, and the NOT FOUND can’t be nested in the current deployment of MySQL’s SQL/PSM stored programs. In this example the storedForeignKeys procedure finds the table’s foreign key constraints, and the columnList function adds the column detail. The command_list table stores the commands to restore foreign key constraints.

The command_list table that stores the values is:

CREATE TABLE command_list
( command_list_id  INT UNSIGNED PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT
, sql_command      VARCHAR(6)    NOT NULL
, sql_object       VARCHAR(10)   NOT NULL
, sql_constraint   VARCHAR(11)
, sql_statement    VARCHAR(768)  NOT NULL);

This is the storedForeignKeys procedure:

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CREATE PROCEDURE storeForeignKeys
( pv_schema_name  VARCHAR(64)
, pv_table_name   VARCHAR(64))
BEGIN
 
  /* Declare local variables. */
  DECLARE lv_schema_name              VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_table_name               VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_constraint_name          VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE sql_stmt                    VARCHAR(1024);
 
  /* Declare control variable for handler. */
  DECLARE fetched    INT DEFAULT 0;
 
  /* Declare local cursor for foreign key table, it uses null replacement
     because the procedure supports null parameters. When you use null 
     parameters, you get all foreign key values. */
  DECLARE foreign_key_table CURSOR FOR
    SELECT   tc.table_schema
    ,        tc.table_name
    ,        tc.constraint_name
    FROM     information_schema.table_constraints tc
    WHERE    tc.table_schema = IFNULL(lv_schema_name, tc.table_schema)
    AND      tc.table_name = IFNULL(lv_table_name, tc.table_name)
    AND      tc.constraint_type = 'FOREIGN KEY'
    ORDER BY tc.table_name;
 
  /* Declare a not found record handler to close a cursor loop. */
  DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET fetched = 1;
 
  /* Assign parameter values to local variables. */
  SET lv_schema_name := pv_schema_name;
  SET lv_table_name := pv_table_name;
 
  /* Open a local cursor. */  
  OPEN foreign_key_table;
  cursor_foreign_key_table: LOOP
 
    /* Fetch a row into the local variables. */
    FETCH foreign_key_table
    INTO  lv_schema_name
    ,     lv_table_name
    ,     lv_constraint_name;
 
    /* Catch handler for no more rows found from the fetch operation. */
    IF fetched = 1 THEN LEAVE cursor_foreign_key_table; END IF;
 
    /* The nested calls to the columnList function returns the list of columns
       in the foreign key. Surrogate primary to foreign keys can be resolved 
       with a simply query but natural primary to foreign key relationships
       require the list of columns involved in the primary and foreign key.
       The columnList function returns the list of foreign key columns in 
       the dependent table and the list of referenced columns (or the primary
       key columns) in the independent table. */
    SET sql_stmt := CONCAT('ALTER TABLE ',' ',lv_schema_name,'.',lv_table_name,' '
                          ,'ADD CONSTRAINT ',lv_constraint_name,' '
                          ,'FOREIGN KEY (',columnList(lv_schema_name,lv_table_name,lv_constraint_name));
 
    /* Record the SQL statements. */
    INSERT INTO command_list
    ( sql_command
    , sql_object
    , sql_constraint
    , sql_statement )
    VALUES
    ('ALTER'
    ,'TABLE'
    ,'FOREIGN KEY'
    , sql_stmt );
 
  END LOOP cursor_foreign_key_table;
  CLOSE foreign_key_table;  
 
END;
$$

This is the columnList function:

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CREATE FUNCTION columnList
( pv_schema_name      VARCHAR(64)
, pv_table_name       VARCHAR(64)
, pv_constraint_name  VARCHAR(64)) RETURNS VARCHAR(512)
BEGIN
 
  /* Declare local variables. */
  DECLARE lv_schema_name              VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_table_name               VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_constraint_name          VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_column_count             INT UNSIGNED;
  DECLARE lv_column_name              VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_column_list              VARCHAR(512);
  DECLARE lv_column_ref_list          VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_referenced_table_schema  VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_referenced_table_name    VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_referenced_column_name   VARCHAR(64);
  DECLARE lv_return_string            VARCHAR(768);
 
  /* Declare control variable for handler. */
  DECLARE fetched    INT DEFAULT 0;
 
  /* Declare local cursor for foreign key column. */
  DECLARE foreign_key_column CURSOR FOR
    SELECT   kcu.column_name
    ,        kcu.referenced_table_schema
    ,        kcu.referenced_table_name
    ,        kcu.referenced_column_name
    FROM     information_schema.key_column_usage kcu
    WHERE    kcu.referenced_table_schema = lv_schema_name
    AND      kcu.table_name = lv_table_name
    AND      kcu.constraint_name = lv_constraint_name
    ORDER BY kcu.column_name;
 
  /* Declare a not found record handler to close a cursor loop. */
  DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET fetched = 1;
 
  /* Assign parameter values to local variables. */
  SET lv_schema_name := pv_schema_name;
  SET lv_table_name := pv_table_name;
  SET lv_constraint_name := pv_constraint_name;
 
  /* Set the first column value. */
  SET lv_column_count := 1;
 
  /* Open the nested cursor. */
  OPEN  foreign_key_column;
  cursor_foreign_key_column: LOOP
 
    /* Fetch a row into the local variables. */    
    FETCH foreign_key_column
    INTO  lv_column_name
    ,     lv_referenced_table_schema
    ,     lv_referenced_table_name
    ,     lv_referenced_column_name;
 
    /* Catch handler for no more rows found from the fetch operation. */
    IF fetched = 1 THEN LEAVE cursor_foreign_key_column; END IF;
 
    /* Initialize the column list or add to it. */
    IF lv_column_count = 1 THEN
      SET lv_column_list := lv_column_name;
      SET lv_column_ref_list := lv_referenced_column_name;
 
      /* Increment the counter value. */
      SET lv_column_count := lv_column_count + 1;
    ELSE
      SET lv_column_list := CONCAT(lv_column_list,',',lv_column_name);
      SET lv_column_ref_list := CONCAT(lv_column_ref_list,',',lv_referenced_column_name);
    END IF;
 
  END LOOP cursor_foreign_key_column;
  CLOSE foreign_key_column;
 
  /* Set the return string to a list of columns. */
  SET lv_return_string :=
        CONCAT(lv_column_list,')',' '
              ,'REFERENCES',' ',lv_referenced_table_schema,'.',lv_referenced_table_name,' ' 
              ,'(',lv_column_ref_list,');');
 
  RETURN lv_return_string;
END;
$$

You can call the procedure with a schema and table name, and you’ll get the foreign keys from just that table. You can create the following parent and child tables to test how multiple column foreign keys work in the script (provided because most folks use surrogate keys):

CREATE TABLE parent
( first_name  VARCHAR(20)  NOT NULL DEFAULT ''
, last_name   VARCHAR(20)  NOT NULL DEFAULT ''
, PRIMARY KEY (first_name, last_name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;
 
CREATE TABLE child
( child_name  VARCHAR(20)  NOT NULL
, first_name  VARCHAR(20)  DEFAULT NULL
, last_name   VARCHAR(20)  DEFAULT NULL
, PRIMARY KEY (child_name)
, KEY fk_parent(first_name, last_name)
, CONSTRAINT fk_parent FOREIGN KEY (first_name, last_name)
  REFERENCES parent (first_name, last_name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

You call the storeForeignKeys procedure for the child table with this syntax:

CALL storeForeignKeys('studentdb', 'child');

You call the storeForeignKeys procedure for all tables in a schema with this syntax:

CALL storeForeignKeys('studentdb', null);

While unlikely you’ll need this, the following calls the storeForeignKeys procedure for all tables in all schemas:

CALL storeForeignKeys(null, null);

You can export the command sequence with the following command to a script file:

SELECT sql_statement
INTO OUTFILE 'c:/Data/MySQL/apply_foreign_keys.sql'
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"'
LINES TERMINATED BY '\r\n'
FROM command_list;

While preservation of tables and foreign keys is best managed by using a tool, like MySQL Workbench, it’s always handy to have scripts to do specific tasks. I hope this helps those looking for how to preserve foreign keys. You also can find a comprehensive treatment on how to write SQL/PSM code in Chapter 14 of my Oracle Database 11g and MySQL 5.6 Developer Handbook.

Written by maclochlainn

March 17th, 2014 at 11:27 pm

Add User Defined Types

with one comment

Somebody asked me if there was a cheaper alternative to using the Embarcadero Data Architect (a data modeling tool). I said sure, you can use the MySQL Workbench. My friend laughed and said, it’s to model Oracle databases and they use different data types. I broke the news to him that he can create his own user defined types and use MySQL Workbench to model problems for the Oracle Database 11g.

For example, you can launch the MySQL Workbench, and click on the Model menu option, and in the menu window click on the User Defined Types choice, as shown in the following:

UserDefinedType

Choosing the User Defined Type option, launches the following form. You can enter customized user defined types in the User Defined Types module:

MySQLWB_UserDefinedTypes01

You enter user defined types by entering a name value and choosing valid MySQL type value before clicking the Add button. When you’ve added your last user defined type, click the OK button instead of the Add button. The next screen shot shows how you can create Oracle Database 11g native data types, specifically the NUMBER and VARCHAR2 data types.

MySQLWB_UserDefinedTypes02

Hopefully, this has shown that you can create User Defined Types let you use MySQL Workbench to create Oracle ERD models. Here’s an example of a table with Oracle’s NUMBER and VARCHAR2 data types:

CustomGLTable

Yes, MySQL Workbench is a marvelous tool with wide potential for use to solve problems with MySQL and other databases.

Written by maclochlainn

February 28th, 2014 at 2:03 am

Relationship Notations

without comments

One of my students asked how to convert MySQL Workbench’s default Crow’s Foot (IE) diagram to one of the other supported formats – Classic, Connect to Columns, UML, and IDEF1X. Crow’s Foot is also known as the Information Engineering Model method (covered in Chapter 3 of my MySQL Workbench: Data Modeling & Development.

It quite simple, you open the Model Overview window, click on the Model menu choice. In the dialog, click on the Relationship Notation menu option. Click on one of the choices in the nested menu, like Column to Columns.

ModifyRelationNotations

Hope this helps those working with MySQL Workbench.

Written by maclochlainn

February 27th, 2014 at 1:22 am

MySQL Image Architecture

with 14 comments

The LinkedIn MySQL DB Development group posed a questions on how to handle images. Naturally, the argument always goes: Should images be deployed in the database or the file system? I believe they should be stored in the database because the cost and time associated is too high with regard to managing files, a file naming schema, and backing up the file system discretely from the database.

Since there’s a significant difference between the backup of transactional data and image data, they should be placed in different databases. The imagedb database is where you would place the images and large text descriptions, as shown in the MySQL Workbench ERD:

imagedb ERD

The imagedb ERD splits the foreign key references back to the system_user table, which contains the individual user credentials. The system_user table serves as the Access Control List (ACL) for the application.

Until I get a chance to write the code for this model, you can refer to the generic PHP/MySQL solution from several years back (its code source was last tested with PHP 5.3). As always, I hope this helps.

Written by maclochlainn

February 23rd, 2014 at 2:02 am

Signal from a procedure

without comments

As I review with my students, a stored function works like a standalone program, while a stored procedure runs in the scope of another program unit. For example, you can compare the result of a function as an expression in an IF statement, like:

  IF add_numbers(1,3) > 3 THEN
    ...
  ELSE
    ...
  END IF;

You can’t call procedures inside an IF statement, but you can call the procedure and use a single OUT-mode (pass-by-reference) parameter from the procedure in a subsequent IF statement. You can implement a a wait procedure like that with the following example.

The example first creates two tables, the road_runner and coyote tables:

-- Drop road_runner table if exists.
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS road_runner;
 
-- Create roadrunner table.
CREATE TABLE road_runner
( road_runner_id    int unsigned  auto_increment primary key
, road_runner_text  varchar(20)
, CONSTRAINT road_runner_nk UNIQUE (road_runner_text));
 
-- Drop coyote table if exists.
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS coyote;
 
-- Create coyote table.
CREATE TABLE coyote
( coyote_id       int unsigned  auto_increment primary key
, coyote_text     varchar(20)
, road_runner_id  int unsigned
, CONSTRAINT coyote_nk UNIQUE (coyote_text));

The following creates a procedure that:

  • Writes data to two tables when the values are unique, returning a value of zero when it works.
  • Writes data to neither table when the values to either table are non-unique, returning a value of one when it fails.

The procedure uses a 0 as a false value and a 1 as a true value. The use of a 0 and 1 for truth is a consistent approach for languages where they don’t support a Boolean data type.

-- Change the delimiter to a "$$"
DELIMITER $$
 
-- Drop the paired procedure.
DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS two_table$$
 
-- Create the paired procedure.
CREATE PROCEDURE two_table
(IN    pv_road_runner_text  varchar(20)
,IN    pv_coyote_text       varchar(20)
,  OUT pv_confirm_it        int)
BEGIN
  /* Declare a variable to hold a sequence value for an 
     auto incrementing value. */
  DECLARE lv_road_runner_id  int unsigned;
 
  /* Declare a condition variable for attempting to write
     a non-unique record to a table. */
  DECLARE duplicate CONDITION FOR 1062;
 
  /* Declare an event handler for a duplicate condition 
     variable, rollback transaction, and set 1 as a false
     condition. */
  DECLARE EXIT HANDLER FOR duplicate
    BEGIN
      ROLLBACK to all_or_none;
      SET pv_confirm_it = 1;
    END;
 
  /* Start the transaction. */
  START TRANSACTION;
 
  /* Set the save point for a multiple table transaction. */
  SAVEPOINT all_or_none;
 
  /* Insert into road runner table. */
  INSERT INTO road_runner
  (road_runner_text)
  VALUES  
  (pv_road_runner_text);
 
  /* Capture the auto incrementing sequence value as a 
     local variable. */
  SET lv_road_runner_id := last_insert_id();
 
  /* Insert into the coyote table. */
  INSERT INTO coyote
  (coyote_text
  ,road_runner_id)
  VALUES  
  (pv_coyote_text
  ,lv_road_runner_id);
 
  /* Commit the record. */
  COMMIT;
 
  /* Set the control variable to a true value. */
  SET pv_confirm_it := 0;
 
END;
$$
 
DELIMITER ;

You can test the pass-by-reference procedure with the following code:

-- Set a control variable with a null value.
SET @sv_control := null;
 
-- Query the results from a join between the road_runner and coyote tables.
SELECT   *
FROM     road_runner r INNER JOIN coyote c
ON       r.road_runner_id = c.road_runner_id;
 
-- Call the two_table procedure with unique results.
CALL two_table('Road Runner 1','Coyote 1',@sv_control);
 
-- Query the control variable result from the second call to the
-- two_table procedure.
SELECT @sv_control AS "1st Insert";
 
-- Reset the value for a second test.
SET @sv_control := 0;
 
-- Call teh two_table procedure with unique results.  
CALL two_table('Road Runner 2','Coyote 1',@sv_control);  
 
-- Query the results from a join between the road_runner and coyote tables.  
SELECT   *
FROM     road_runner r INNER JOIN coyote c
ON       r.road_runner_id = c.road_runner_id;
 
-- Query the control variable result from the second call to the
-- two_table procedure.
SELECT   @sv_control AS "2nd Insert";

I hope this helps anybody trying to implement a pass-by-reference procedure with a control variable. You can find other examples in Chapter 14 of Oracle Database 11g and MySQL 5.6 Developer Handbook (pp. 446-449 and 450-451).

Written by maclochlainn

February 16th, 2014 at 5:22 pm