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Best UTL_FILE Practice

with 3 comments

In a post a couple days ago, I promised to provide a best practice approach to reading external files with the UTL_FILE package. My first assumption is that you’re reading unstructured data because structured data is best read by external tables because external tables can read data much faster with the PARALLEL option.

My second assumption is that you’re you don’t know how to use or choose not to use the DBMS_LOB package; specifically, the loadclobfromfile and loadblobfromfile procedures. By the way, Chapter 10 of the Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming has several complete examples using the DBMS_LOB package. My third assumption is that you’d like the external file packaged as a whole, which means you want it returned as a CLOB or BLOB data type.

Here’s a generic function that achieves that and avoids the nonsense with closing the file in the exception handler, or worse yet, wrapping it in another PL/SQL schema-level function:

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CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION read_file_to_clob
( pv_location   VARCHAR2
, pv_file_name  VARCHAR2 ) RETURN CLOB IS 
 
  /* Declare local input variables. */
  lv_location      VARCHAR2(60);
  lv_file_name     VARCHAR2(40);
 
  /* Declare a file reference pointer and buffer. */
  lv_file    UTL_FILE.FILE_TYPE;  -- File reference
  lv_line    VARCHAR2(32767);     -- Reading buffer
 
  /* Declare local sizing variables. */
  lv_file_size  NUMBER;
  lv_line_size  NUMBER;
  lv_read_size  NUMBER :=0;
 
    /* Declare local file attribute data. */
  lv_file_exists  BOOLEAN := FALSE;
  lv_block_size   BINARY_INTEGER;
 
  /* Declare a control variable and return CLOB variable. */
  lv_enable  BOOLEAN := FALSE;
  lv_return  CLOB;
BEGIN
  /* Declare local input variables. */
  lv_location  := pv_location;
  lv_file_name := pv_file_name;
 
  /* Check for open file and close when open. */
  IF utl_file.is_open(lv_file) THEN
    utl_file.fclose(lv_file);
  END IF;
 
  /* Read the file attributes to get the physical size. */
  utl_file.fgetattr( location    => lv_location
                   , filename    => lv_file_name
                   , fexists     => lv_file_exists
                   , file_length => lv_file_size
                   , block_size  => lv_block_size ); 
 
  /* Open only files that exist. */
  IF lv_file_exists THEN
 
    /* Create a temporary CLOB in memory. */
    dbms_lob.createtemporary(lv_return, FALSE, dbms_lob.CALL);
 
    /* Open the file for read-only of 32,767 byte lines. */
    lv_file := utl_file.fopen( location     => lv_location
                             , filename     => lv_file_name
                             , open_mode    => 'R'
                             , max_linesize => 32767);
 
 
    /* Read all lines of a text file. */
    WHILE (lv_read_size < lv_file_size) LOOP
      /* Read a line of text until the eof marker. */
      utl_file.get_line( file   => lv_file
                       , buffer => lv_line );
 
      /* Add the line terminator or 2 bytes to its length. */
      lv_line := NVL(lv_line,'')||CHR(10);
      lv_read_size := lv_read_size
                    + LENGTH(NVL(lv_line,CHR(10))) + 2;
 
      /* Write to an empty CLOB or append to an existing CLOB. */
      IF NOT lv_enable THEN
        /* Write to the temporary CLOB variable. */
        dbms_lob.WRITE( lv_return, LENGTH(lv_line), 1, lv_line);
 
        /* Set the control variable. */
        lv_enable := TRUE;
      ELSE
        /* Append to the temporary CLOB variable. */
        dbms_lob.writeappend( lv_return, LENGTH(lv_line),lv_line);
      END IF;
    END LOOP;
 
    /* Close the file. */
    utl_file.fclose(lv_file);
  END IF;
 
  /* This line is never reached. */
  RETURN lv_return;
EXCEPTION
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
    utl_file.fclose(lv_file);
    RAISE NO_DATA_FOUND;
END;
/

You can test the function with the following:

SET LONG 100000
SET PAGESIZE 999
 
SELECT read_file_to_clob('SomeVirtualDirectory','TextFile.txt') AS "Output"
FROM   dual;

If anybody has suggestions for improvements, please pass them along. As always, I hope this helps other developers.

Written by maclochlainn

April 16th, 2014 at 3:07 am

Using UTL_FILE Package

with 5 comments

Sometimes I’m surprised. Today, the surprise came when somebody pointed to a potential error in another author’s book. The person who asked the question had to send me a screen shot before I believed it.

The author’s code encounters the following error because the code was designed to loop through a multiple line file, and the code called the UTL_FILE.FOPEN procedure with three instead of four parameters. While it works with only three parameters when the strings are less than or equal to 1,024 (thanks Gary), it throws read errors when a string exceeds the default. You use the fourth parameter when your string exceeds the default length of 1,024.

DECLARE
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-29284: file READ error
ORA-06512: at "SYS.UTL_FILE", line 106
ORA-06512: at "SYS.UTL_FILE", line 746
ORA-06512: at line 26

As mentioned, you fix the problem by using the fourth parameter like the call on lines 15 through 18 below:

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DECLARE
  /* Declare local input variables. */
  lv_location      VARCHAR2(60) := 'C:\Data\Direct';
  lv_file_name     VARCHAR2(40) := 'TextFile.txt';
 
  /* Declare a file reference pointer and buffer. */
  lv_file     UTL_FILE.FILE_TYPE;  -- File reference
  lv_line     VARCHAR2(32767);     -- Reading buffer
 
BEGIN
 
  /* Check for open file and close when open. */
  IF utl_file.is_open(lv_file) THEN
    utl_file.fclose(lv_file);
  END IF;
 
  /* Open the file for read-only of 32,767 lines of text.
     The fourth parameter is required when you want to use
     the GET_LINE procedure to read a file line-by-line. */
  lv_file := utl_file.fopen( location     => lv_location
                           , filename     => lv_file_name
                           , open_mode    => 'R'
                           , max_linesize => 32767);
 
  /* Read all lines of a text file. */
  LOOP
    /* Read a line of text, when the eof marker is found 
       the get_line procedure raises a NO_DATA_FOUND 
       error, which is why there's no explicit loop. */
    utl_file.get_line( file   => lv_file
                     , buffer => lv_line );
 
    /* Print the line of text or a line return because
       UTL_FILE doesn't read line returns. */
    dbms_output.put_line(NVL(lv_line,CHR(10)));
 
  END LOOP;
 
EXCEPTION
  WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
    utl_file.fclose(lv_file);
END;
/

While the foregoing is traditional and uses a physical directory path from the local server’s operating system, you can use a virtual directory from Oracle Database 10g forward. This physical directory is also defined in the utl_file_dir parameter of the database server. A virtual directory hides the physical directory from the application software, which simplifies physical file maintenance when you need to move the files.

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  lv_location      VARCHAR2(60) := 'DirectVirtualDirectory';

The preceding example works, and I’ll put one out converting the external to CLOB later in the week.

Written by maclochlainn

April 13th, 2014 at 11:46 pm

DBMS_JAVA Privilege Error?

without comments

It’s possible to get an error after granting privileges to an external file system. One of those errors is tedious to resolve until you understand the rules governing Java NIO file permissions.

You grant privileges to external file systems as the sys user with the grant_permission procedure of the dbms_java package, like

SQL> BEGIN
  2    DBMS_JAVA.GRANT_PERMISSION('IMPORTER'
  3                               ,'SYS:java.io.FilePermission'
  4                               ,'C:\Data\Upload'
  5                               ,'read');
  6  END;
  7  /

After you grant privileges to read, write, and delete files with Oracle’s dbms_java package, you must disconnect any active session to enjoy the new privileges. If you forget to disconnect and re-connect an active session, you get the following error message:

FROM     TABLE(list_files(get_directory_path('STAGE')))
               *
ERROR at line 2:
ORA-29532: Java CALL TERMINATED BY uncaught Java exception:
java.security.AccessControlException: Directory permissions restricted.

The problem and fix are simple. The permissions aren’t in effect until after you disconnect and reconnect your active sessions. I put this there because when I Google’d it, there wasn’t an answer already.

While I’m on the topic of privilege errors, that aren’t really errors, I thought it would be helpful to qualify how the delete permission works because I couldn’t find it anywhere in the Oracle documentation (if somebody finds it let make a comment that enriches the discussion). Unlike the read and write permissions, the delete permission requires permissions on specific files.

If you only grant permission on like:

SQL> BEGIN
  2    DBMS_JAVA.GRANT_PERMISSION('IMPORTER'
  3                               ,'SYS:java.io.FilePermission'
  4                               ,'C:\Data\Upload'
  5                               ,'read,write,delete');
  6  END;
  7  /

You would get this message when trying to delete an external file:

BEGIN
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-29532: Java CALL TERMINATED BY uncaught Java exception:
java.security.AccessControlException: the Permission (java.io.FilePermission
c:\DATA\log\item_import.log READ) has NOT been GRANTED TO IMPORTER. The PL/SQL
TO GRANT this IS dbms_java.grant_permission( 'IMPORTER',
'SYS:java.io.FilePermission', 'c:\data\log\item_import.log', 'read' )
ORA-06512: at "IMPORTER.DELETE_FILE", line 1
ORA-06512: at line 2

It requires that you grant permissions on individual files to have the privilege of deleting them from within Oracle. That grant would look like the following:

SQL> BEGIN
  2    DBMS_JAVA.GRANT_PERMISSION('IMPORTER'
  3                               ,'SYS:java.io.FilePermission'
  4                               ,'C:\Data\Upload\item_import.log'
  5                               ,'read,write,delete');
  6  END;
  7  /

As always, I hope this helps other developers.

Written by maclochlainn

March 29th, 2014 at 1:59 pm

Hidden DBMS_JAVA Nuance

without comments

It always happens when I’m in a hurry. Yes, I ran into one of those pesky little features with Oracle’s DBMS_JAVA package. While I try to write entries with proper GeSHi case semantics, like everyone else I tend to write PL/SQL initially in lowercase. That led me to the discovery of this wonderful error message:

BEGIN
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-29532: Java CALL TERMINATED BY uncaught Java exception:
oracle.aurora.vm.IdNotFoundException: importer : USER OR ROLE id does NOT exist
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_JAVA", line 705
ORA-06512: at line 2

The problem was simple, while not published, you must enter the user/schema name in uppercase text when calling DBMS_JAVA.GRANT_PERMISSION procedure. Here’s a proper example:

SQL> BEGIN
  2    DBMS_JAVA.GRANT_PERMISSION('IMPORTER'
  3                               ,'SYS:java.io.FilePermission'
  4                               ,'C:\Data\Upload'
  5                               ,'read');
  6  END;
  7  /

If you change the IMPORTER string to lower or mixed case, you raise the aforementioned error. Quite an interesting tidbit that I missed from Oracle Database 10g until Oracle Database 12c. Hope this helps you avoid wondering what’s happening when your line 2 looks like this:

  2    DBMS_JAVA.GRANT_PERMISSION('Importer'

As always, I hope this helps others. If you like more on writing Java inside the Oracle database you can check this older post.

Written by maclochlainn

March 21st, 2014 at 12:44 am

Speaking at UTOUG 2014

with one comment

Oracle Database 12c PL./SQL ProgrammingI’m off shortly to attend and speak at the Utah Oracle User Group’s Spring Training Days 2014, which is held at Salt Lake Community College – Larry H. Miller Campus. My presentation is on writing PL/SQL for Oracle Database 12c. We’ll be covering how you can best anchor PL/SQL cursors to include or exclude hidden columns, and how to work with identifying columns in the scope of multiple table inserts.

I have copy of Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming to give away in my session and John Harper’s session. While the book is also available on Kindle, Mac OS X users can get it as a natively as an iBook on the Apple Store. I’ve got a copy on my iPad and it looks great. What I especially like is the search feature.

Written by maclochlainn

March 11th, 2014 at 1:03 pm

Posted in Oracle,Oracle 12c,UTOUG

Tagged with ,

Find Type Dependents

without comments

Somebody thought it was nice to show how to drop object type dependents in Oracle Database 11g, but they thought I should show how you discover dependent object types first. More or less, they were concerned how they discover type dependents when they raise the following error:

DROP TYPE item_object
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-02303: cannot DROP OR REPLACE a TYPE WITH TYPE OR TABLE dependents

They had a great point, so here I’m providing and object table function (object table functions are covered in Chapter 8 of Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming book) that displays an object dependency tree.

Unlike table functions in Microsoft SQL Server or PostgreSQL, Oracle requires that you create the object type before you can return a result set table from a parameter-driven function. Here’s the object type for this object table function:

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-- Create an object type that mimics a record structure.  
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE type_tree IS object
( level_id     NUMBER
, type_name    VARCHAR2(30)
, object       VARCHAR2(10)
, parent_type  VARCHAR2(30)); 
/
 
-- Create a UDT Collection.
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE type_tree_table IS TABLE OF type_tree;
/

Now, you can create the object table function that returns an object type dependent tree. This function uses branching recursion because you need to walk the dependency tree. The cursor against the three types of metadata in the database catalog lets us walk the tree. Each object type, and their dependents may have:

  • A dependent object type
  • A dependent collection, which uses the object type as a base object type.
  • A dependent schema function, which uses the object type as a parameter data type or return data type.
  • A dependent schema procedure, which uses the object type as a parameter data type.
  • A dependent package, which contains a function or procedure using the object type as a parameter data type, or a function using the object type as a return data type.

Here’s the type_dependent function that walks the tree and displays the hierarchical results:

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CREATE OR REPLACE
  FUNCTION type_dependents
  ( pv_base_object_type  VARCHAR2
  , pv_level_id          NUMBER DEFAULT 1
  , pv_collection        TYPE_TREE_TABLE DEFAULT NULL ) RETURN TYPE_TREE_TABLE IS
 
  /* Declare a return data type. */
  lv_level_id     NUMBER;
 
  /* Declare item type. */
  lv_type_name    VARCHAR2(30);
  lv_object_type  VARCHAR2(30);
  lv_parent_type  VARCHAR2(30);
 
  /* Declare a collection variable. */
  lv_collection   TYPE_TREE_TABLE := type_tree_table();
  lv_incoming     TYPE_TREE_TABLE := type_tree_table();
 
  /* The first part of the cursor finds the dependent type names of complex object 
     types, and the second part of the cursor finds the dependent collection types.
     Effectively the set operator finds two distinct branches because you may use
     any base type as an element of a complex object or of a collection. */
  CURSOR base_type 
  ( cv_level_id   NUMBER
  , cv_base_type  VARCHAR2 ) IS
    SELECT  (cv_level_id) AS level_id
    ,        LPAD(' ', 2*(cv_level_id - 1)) || ut.type_name AS type_name
    ,        ut.typecode AS object_type
    ,        NULL AS parent_type
    FROM     user_types ut
    WHERE    ut.type_name = cv_base_type;
 
  CURSOR dependent_type 
  ( cv_level_id   NUMBER
  , cv_base_type  VARCHAR2 ) IS
    SELECT   cv_level_id AS level_id
    ,        LPAD(' ', 2*(cv_level_id - 1)) || uta.type_name AS type_name
    ,        ut.typecode AS object_type
    ,        ut.type_name AS parent_type
    FROM     user_type_attrs uta INNER JOIN user_types ut
    ON       uta.attr_type_name = ut.type_name
    WHERE    ut.type_name = cv_base_type
    UNION ALL
    SELECT   cv_level_id AS level_id
    ,        LPAD(' ', 2*(cv_level_id - 1)) || uct.type_name AS type_name
    ,        CASE
               WHEN uct.coll_type = 'TABLE' THEN
                 uct.coll_type
               ELSE
                'VARRAY'
             END AS object_type
    ,        ut.type_name AS parent_type
    FROM     user_types ut INNER JOIN user_coll_types uct
    ON       ut.type_name = uct.elem_type_name
    WHERE    uct.elem_type_name = cv_base_type
    UNION ALL
    SELECT   cv_level_id AS level_id
    ,        CASE
               WHEN package_name IS NULL THEN
                 LPAD(' ', 2*(cv_level_id - 1)) || ua.object_name
               ELSE
                 LPAD(' ', 2*(cv_level_id - 1)) || ua.package_name
             END AS type_name
    ,        CASE
               WHEN package_name IS NULL THEN
                 uo.object_type
               ELSE
                'PACKAGE'
             END AS object_type
    ,        ua.type_name AS parent_type
    FROM     user_arguments ua LEFT JOIN user_objects uo
    ON       ua.package_name = uo.object_name
    OR       ua.object_name = uo.object_name
    WHERE    type_name = cv_base_type
    ORDER BY object_type;
 
BEGIN
 
  /* Set the call level indicator. */
  lv_level_id := pv_level_id;
 
  /* Check if the collection holds values, which should occur in recursive calls.  */
  IF pv_collection IS NOT NULL THEN
    lv_collection := pv_collection;
  ELSE
    /* Open the base type and record level 1. */
    OPEN  base_type (lv_level_id, pv_base_object_type);
    FETCH base_type
    INTO  lv_level_id
    ,     lv_type_name
    ,     lv_object_type
    ,     lv_parent_type;
    CLOSE base_type;
 
    /* Extend the collection. */
    lv_collection.EXTEND;
    lv_collection(lv_collection.COUNT) := type_tree( lv_level_id
                                                   , lv_type_name
                                                   , lv_object_type
                                                   , lv_parent_type );
 
    /* Increment the type dependency level. */
    lv_level_id := lv_level_id + 1;
 
  END IF;
 
  /* Loop through and return records. */
  FOR i IN dependent_type(lv_level_id, pv_base_object_type) LOOP
 
    /* Extend the collection. */
    lv_collection.EXTEND;
    lv_collection(lv_collection.COUNT) := type_tree( i.level_id
                                                   , i.type_name
                                                   , i.object_type
                                                   , i.parent_type );
 
    /* Recursively call down to dependent types. */
    IF i.type_name <> i.parent_type THEN
      lv_collection := type_dependents(TRIM(i.type_name), (lv_level_id + 1), lv_collection);
    END IF;
 
  END LOOP;
 
  /* Return 0 for false. */
  RETURN lv_collection;
END;
/

You would query the function with the TABLE function, like this:

COLUMN level_id     FORMAT 99999 HEADING "Level|ID #"
COLUMN type_name    FORMAT A30   HEADING "Type Name"
COLUMN object       FORMAT A10   HEADING "Object Type"
COLUMN parent_type  FORMAT A30   HEADING "Parent Type"
 
SELECT   *
FROM     TABLE(type_dependents('ITEM_OBJECT',1));

It displays the following results based on the sample types created by the original blog post:

 Level
  ID # Type Name                      Object Typ Parent Type
------ ------------------------------ ---------- ------------------------
     1 ITEM_OBJECT                    OBJECT
     2   GET_ITEM_OBJECT              FUNCTION   ITEM_OBJECT
     2   IDENTIFIED_OBJECT            OBJECT     ITEM_OBJECT
     2   ITEM_PACKAGE                 PACKAGE    ITEM_OBJECT
     2   ITEM_TABLE                   TABLE      ITEM_OBJECT
     3     ITEM_ASYNC_TABLE           COLLECTION ITEM_TABLE
     4       ITEM_LIST                TABLE      ITEM_ASYNC_TABLE
     2   ITEM_VARRAY                  VARRAY     ITEM_OBJECT
     3     ITEM_ASYNC_VARRAY          COLLECTION ITEM_VARRAY
     4       ITEM_ARRAY               VARRAY     ITEM_ASYNC_VARRAY
 
10 rows selected.

I hope this helps those working with Oracle Database 10g (de-supported), 11g, or 12c. As a note, you don’t need to drop type dependents in Oracle 12c because it supports type evolution. I cover type evolution in Appendix B of Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming. As always, I hope this helps those trying to determine type dependents in an Oracle database.

Written by maclochlainn

March 8th, 2014 at 10:33 am

Add User Defined Types

with one comment

Somebody asked me if there was a cheaper alternative to using the Embarcadero Data Architect (a data modeling tool). I said sure, you can use the MySQL Workbench. My friend laughed and said, it’s to model Oracle databases and they use different data types. I broke the news to him that he can create his own user defined types and use MySQL Workbench to model problems for the Oracle Database 11g.

For example, you can launch the MySQL Workbench, and click on the Model menu option, and in the menu window click on the User Defined Types choice, as shown in the following:

UserDefinedType

Choosing the User Defined Type option, launches the following form. You can enter customized user defined types in the User Defined Types module:

MySQLWB_UserDefinedTypes01

You enter user defined types by entering a name value and choosing valid MySQL type value before clicking the Add button. When you’ve added your last user defined type, click the OK button instead of the Add button. The next screen shot shows how you can create Oracle Database 11g native data types, specifically the NUMBER and VARCHAR2 data types.

MySQLWB_UserDefinedTypes02

Hopefully, this has shown that you can create User Defined Types let you use MySQL Workbench to create Oracle ERD models. Here’s an example of a table with Oracle’s NUMBER and VARCHAR2 data types:

CustomGLTable

Yes, MySQL Workbench is a marvelous tool with wide potential for use to solve problems with MySQL and other databases.

Written by maclochlainn

February 28th, 2014 at 2:03 am

Drop Types Recursively

with one comment

As covered in my new Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming book (publisher’s satisfied), you can evolve object types. That means you can change a base object type and the change cascades through dependents. Somebody asked how to remove an object type chain without appending the FORCE clause.

It’s quite easy if you understand writing a recursive function in PL/SQL, as done here:

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-- Create a recursive function.
CREATE OR REPLACE
  FUNCTION drop_dependents
  (pv_base_object_type  VARCHAR2) RETURN NUMBER IS
 
  /* Declare a return data type. */
  lv_retval  NUMBER := 0;
 
  /* Declare item type. */
  lv_type_name    VARCHAR2(30);
  lv_object_name  VARCHAR2(30);
 
  /* The first part of the cursor finds the dependent type names of complex object 
     types, and the second part of the cursor finds the dependent collection types.
     Effectively the set operator finds two distinct branches because you may use
     any base type as an element of a complex object or of a collection. */
  CURSOR base_type 
  (cv_base_type  VARCHAR2) IS
    SELECT   uta.type_name
    ,        NULL AS object_name
    FROM     user_type_attrs uta INNER JOIN user_types ut
    ON       uta.attr_type_name = ut.type_name
    WHERE    ut.type_name = cv_base_type
    UNION ALL
    SELECT   uct.type_name
    ,        NULL AS object_name
    FROM     user_types ut INNER JOIN user_coll_types uct
    ON       ut.type_name = uct.elem_type_name
    WHERE    uct.elem_type_name = cv_base_type
    UNION ALL
    SELECT   CASE
               WHEN package_name IS NULL THEN
                 uo.object_type
               ELSE
                 'PACKAGE'
             END AS type_name
    ,        CASE
               WHEN package_name IS NULL THEN
                 ua.object_name
               ELSE
                 ua.package_name
             END AS object_name
    FROM     user_arguments ua LEFT JOIN user_objects uo
    ON       ua.package_name = uo.object_name
    OR       ua.object_name = uo.object_name
    WHERE    type_name = cv_base_type;
 
BEGIN
 
  /* Open a parameterized cursor. */  
  OPEN  base_type(pv_base_object_type);
 
  /* Loop through return records. */
  LOOP
    /* Fetch records. */
    FETCH base_type
    INTO  lv_type_name
    ,     lv_object_name;
 
    /* Drop type without dependents, or drop leaf node dependent. */
    IF base_type%NOTFOUND THEN
 
      /* Drop functions when they include an object type or object type
         dependent as a formal parameter type or return type. Drop
         procedures when they include an object type or object type
         dependent. Drop procedures when any function or procedure
         uses an object type or object type dependent. */
      IF lv_type_name IN ('FUNCTION','PACKAGE','PROCEDURE') THEN
 
        /* Drop the base type when no dependents are found. */
        EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'DROP '||lv_type_name||' '||lv_object_name;
 
      ELSE
 
        /* Drop the base type when no dependents are found. */
        EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'DROP TYPE '||pv_base_object_type;
 
      END IF;
 
      /* Set exit state to one or true. */
      lv_retval := 1;
 
      /* Exit the loop. */
      EXIT;
 
    ELSE
 
      /* A type must exclude function, package, and procedure; and the
         object name must be null before you recurse to another level. */
      IF lv_type_name NOT IN ('FUNCTION','PACKAGE','PROCEDURE') AND
         lv_object_name IS NOT NULL THEN
 
        /* Drop base type when no dependents are found. */
        lv_retval := drop_dependents(lv_type_name);
 
      END IF;
 
    END IF;
  END LOOP;
 
  /* Close open cursor. */
  CLOSE base_type;
 
  /* Return 0 for false. */
  RETURN lv_retval;
END;
/

Somebody asked me to provide a test case of a hierarchy of object types to support the drop_dependents function. So, here’s the test case code:

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-- Create object type.
CREATE OR REPLACE 
  TYPE item_object IS OBJECT
  ( item_name     VARCHAR2(30)
  , item_subname  VARCHAR2(30));
/
 
-- Create object type.
CREATE OR REPLACE 
  TYPE identified_object IS OBJECT
  ( identified_id      NUMBER
  , identified_object  item_object);
/
 
-- Create object collection.
CREATE OR REPLACE
  TYPE item_table IS TABLE OF item_object;
/
 
-- Create object collection.
CREATE OR REPLACE
  TYPE item_varray IS VARRAY(5) OF item_object;
/
 
-- Create object type.
CREATE OR REPLACE 
  TYPE item_async_table IS OBJECT
  ( item_name        VARCHAR2(30)
  , item_collection  item_table);
/
 
-- Create object type.
CREATE OR REPLACE 
  TYPE item_async_varray IS OBJECT
  ( item_name        VARCHAR2(30)
  , item_collection  item_varray);
/
 
-- Create object collection.
CREATE OR REPLACE
  TYPE item_list IS TABLE OF item_async_table;
/
 
-- Create object collection.
CREATE OR REPLACE
  TYPE item_array IS VARRAY(10) OF item_async_varray;
/
 
-- Create package specification.
CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE item_package AS
 
  /* A published function of the package. */
  FUNCTION initialize_object
  ( id    NUMBER
  , name  NUMBER ) RETURN ITEM_OBJECT;
 
END item_package;
/
 
-- Create a schema function.
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_item_object
  ( pv_id    NUMBER
  , pv_name  NUMBER ) RETURN ITEM_OBJECT IS
 
  /* Declare a local variable. */
  lv_item_object   ITEM_OBJECT;
 
BEGIN
 
  /* Initialize the object type. */
  lv_item_object := item_object(pv_id, pv_name);  
 
  /* Return the dat type. */
  RETURN lv_item_object;
END;
/

If you call the function with the base type, it’ll drop the most dependent object type first, and the base object type last. The rest are dropped in their order of dependency. You can call a drop_dependents function with a base type, like ITEM_OBJECT, by using the following syntax:

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SET SERVEROUTPUT ON SIZE UNLIMITED
BEGIN
  IF drop_dependents('ITEM_OBJECT') = 1 THEN
    dbms_output.put_line('Objects dropped.');
  END IF;
END;
/

Hope this helps those looking to drop a chain of object types in an Oracle database.

Written by maclochlainn

February 18th, 2014 at 3:39 am

Mac Mini to the rescue

with 7 comments

In teaching, I had a problem because my students have different base operating systems, like Windows 7, Windows 8, Linux, and Mac OS X. I needed a teaching and lecture platform that would let me teach it all (not to mention support their environments). That meant it had to virtualize any of the following with a portable device:MacMiniConsole

  • Windows 7 or 8 hosting natively an Oracle Database 11g XE, 11g, or 12c and MySQL Database 5.6
  • Windows 7 or 8 hosting a Fedora or Oracle Unbreakable Linux VM (3 or 4 GB) with Oracle Database 11g XE, 11g, or 12c and MySQL Database 5.6
  • Mac OS X hosting a Fedora or Oracle Unbreakable Linux VM (3 or 4 GB) with Oracle Database 11g XE, 11g, or 12c and MySQL Database 5.6
  • Ubuntu hosting a Fedora or Oracle Unbreakable Linux VM (3 or 4 GB) with Oracle Database 11g XE, 11g, or 12c and MySQL Database 5.6

I never considered a manufacturer other than Apple for a laptop since they adopted the Intel chip. Too many of the others sell non-hyperthreaded laptop machines that they market as i5 or i7 64-bit OS machines when they’re not. Some of those vendors disable the hyperthreading facility while others provide motherboards that can’t support hyperthreading. The ones I dislike the most provide a BIOS setting that gives the impression you can enable hyperthreading when you can’t. All Apple devices, MacBook, MacBook Pro, Mac Mini, and Mac Pro do fully support a 64-bit OS and their virtualization.

A MacBook Pro came to mind but the disk space requirements were 1 TB, and that’s too pricey. I went with the Mac Mini because with 16 GB of memory and a 1 TB drive it was only $1,200. Add a wireless keyboard and mighty mouse, and an HDMI and mini-DVI connections, and I had my solution. Naturally, my desktop is a one generation old Mac Pro with 64 GB of memory and 12 TB of disk space, which supports all the virtual machines used for testing. Note to Apple marketing staff: The prior version of the Mac Pro let you pay reasonable (3rd party) prices for the additional memory and disk drives.

The Mac Mini means I can travel anywhere and plug into the console and demo tools and techniques from a myriad set of platforms without the hassle of moving on and off to frequently VM images. It’s a great solution with only one downside, HDMI to DVI sometimes creates purple toned screens. It’s unfortunate because some venues have monitors that don’t support HDMI).

Written by maclochlainn

February 6th, 2014 at 12:17 pm

Oracle 12c PL/SQL Published

with 4 comments

Oracle Database 12c PL./SQL ProgrammingAfter writing nine books, it’s always great when the author copies arrive. That’s when I know the process is complete. Friday, my twelve copies of the Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming book arrived in two boxes of six each. The book is also available online at Amazon.com.

The book qualifies all the Oracle 12c new SQL and PL/SQL features. I added review sections and mastery questions to each chapter, and expanded examples and techniques. To conserve space and avoid reprinting duplicate code blocks, I adopted line numbers for the code segments so I could provide the technique variations by line numbers for alternate solutions.

You have complete examples on how to white list functions, procedures, packages, and object types with the new ACCESSIBLE BY clause. Likewise, you’ll learn how to use your PL/SQL variables inside embedded queries.

The improved collection coverage shows you how to write PL/SQL functions that let you use unnested UPDATE statements to add, change, and remove elements from Attribute Data Types (ADTs), and the expanded SQL Primer shows you how to update nested User-Defined Types (UDTs) without having to write PL/SQL. The book also shows you how to export object tables or columns into relational tables for ETL processes.

Oracle12cBooksArriveThe Oracle Database Primer grew to include more database administration, multiversion concurrency control, SQL tuning, and SQL tracing. The SQL Primer now contains expanded coverage on data types, Data Definition Language (DDL), Data Manipulation Language (DML), Transaction Control Language (TCL), SQL queries, joins, and unnesting queries. The SQL Built-in Functions appendix was expanded to enable me to remove side discussions about SQL elements from the PL/SQL chapters. John Harper wrote some wonderful examples of DBMS_COMPARISON, DBMS_CRYPTO, and DBMS_FGA to supplement the PL/SQL Built-in Packages and Types appendix. The Regular Expression Primer was rewritten to make it easier to read and use.

I’ve created an Errata for the Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming. If you buy a copy and find an error, please post a comment in the errata.

Written by maclochlainn

February 1st, 2014 at 9:31 pm