MacLochlainns Weblog

Michael McLaughlin's Technical Blog

Site Admin

Archive for the ‘VMWare’ Category

VMware 7 Upgrade

without comments

VMwareUpgrade7I finally upgraded from VMware Fusion 6 to VMware Fusion 7 to take advantage of the new features. It was interesting to upgrade the Windows 7 virtual machine because of the unique failure message it raised.

The message said it was incompatible, and that I should navigate to:

Virtual Machine -> Settings -> Compatibility -> Upgrade

The Upgrade button checks the Allow upgrading the virtual hardware for this virtual machine checkbox. You will get prompted with the Would you like to upgrade this virtual machine? dialog for the next virtual machine.

Written by maclochlainn

December 23rd, 2014 at 12:17 am

Fedora VMWare Upgrade

with 2 comments

When a new update of VMWare comes out, and it is time to upgrade VMWare Tools. Here’s an update on the instructions for upgrading VMWare Tools 6.0.1 through 6.0.4:

  1. Navigate to the VMWare Menu, choose Virtual Machine and in the drop down menu Install VMWare Tools. This will mount a virtual CD in the Oracle Unbreakable Linux virtual machine and it launches the following dialog box:
VMware962

  1. Open a terminal session by right clicking anywhere in the desktop, and then choose Open in Terminal from the context menu. You can then run the VMWare Toolkit by following these instructions as the root user:

The instructions for VMWare 6.0.0 through 6.0.2 are:

cd /media/VMware\ Tools
cp VMwareTools-9.6.2-1688356.tar.gz /tmp
cd /tmp
gunzip VMwareTools-9.6.2-1688356.tar.gz
tar -xvf VMwareTools-9.6.2-1688356.tar
cd vmware-tools-distrib
sudo ./vmware-install.pl

VMWare changed where the VMWare Tools CD are mounted. You can discover it by clicking on the VMware Tools in the left pane (this assumes you log on to Fedora as the student user, and the student user is a sudo-enabled user)

VMWare6.0.4

The instructions for VMWare Tools 6.0.4 forward are listed below. Only the first command changes. You should also note that the VMWare Tools library is the same:

cd /run/media/student/VMware\ Tools
cp VMwareTools-9.6.2-1688356.tar.gz /tmp
cd /tmp
gunzip VMwareTools-9.6.2-1688356.tar.gz
tar -xvf VMwareTools-9.6.2-1688356.tar
cd vmware-tools-distrib
sudo ./vmware-install.pl

The last step requires that you reply to a set of prompts. If you’d like to accept the default at one time, you can use the following command:

sudo ./vmware-install.pl --default

Lastly, you’ll get these instructions form the Perl script that installs the VMWare tools:

The configuration of VMware Tools 9.6.2 build-1688356 for Linux for this 
running kernel completed successfully.
 
You must restart your X session before any mouse or graphics changes take 
effect.
 
You can now run VMware Tools by invoking "/usr/bin/vmware-toolbox-cmd" from the
command line.
 
To enable advanced X features (e.g., guest resolution fit, drag and drop, and 
file and text copy/paste), you will need to do one (or more) of the following:
1. Manually start /usr/bin/vmware-user
2. Log out and log back into your desktop session; and,
3. Restart your X session.
 
Enjoy,
 
--the VMware team

Written by maclochlainn

July 3rd, 2014 at 2:00 am

Posted in Fedora,Linux,VMWare

Tagged with , ,

A/UX, NeXTSTEP, & OS X

with 5 comments

One thing that gets tedious in the IT community and Oracle community is the penchant for Windows only solutions. While Microsoft does an excellent job in certain domains, I remain a loyal Apple customer. By the way, you can install Oracle Client software on Mac OS X and run SQL Developer against any Oracle Database server. You can even run MySQL Workbench and MySQL server natively on the Mac OS X platform, which creates a robust development platform and gives you more testing options with the MySQL monitor (the client software).

Notwithstanding, some Windows users appear to malign Apple and the Mac OS X on compatibility, but they don’t understand that it’s a derivative of the Research Unix, through BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution). This Unix lineage chart illustrates it well:

Screen Shot 2014-04-18 at 3.49.39 PM

I’m probably loyal to Apple because in the early 1990’s I worked on Mac OS 6, Mac OS 7, A/UX, NeXTSTEP, and AIX/6000 (Version 3) while working at APL (American President Lines) in Oakland, California. Back then, my desktop was a pricey Macintosh Quadra 950 and today I work on a pricey Mac Pro desktop. The Mac Pro lets me use VMware virtualize development environments for Oracle Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Fedora, and as you might guess Windows 7/8. My question to those dyed in the wool Microsoft users is simple, why would you choose a single user OS like Windows over a multi-user OS like Mac OS X?

Written by maclochlainn

April 18th, 2014 at 4:28 pm

Fedora Install of MySQL

with 16 comments

I built a new image on VMWare Fusion for my class, which required installing MySQL 5.6 on Fedora, Version 20. If you don’t know how to add your user to the sudoers list, you should check this older and recently updated blog post.

  1. Download the MySQL Yum Repository and launch the downloaded RPM.
  1. Install MySQL on Fedora, Version 20, which you can find with the following command:
shell> rpm -qa | grep mysql
mysql-community-release-fc20-5.noarch

The fc20-5 changes with point releases, but assuming that you’re installing the fc20-5 release:

shell> sudo yum localinstall mysql-community-release-fc20-5.noarch.rpm
  1. Install MySQL on Fedora with the following command:
shell> sudo yum install mysql-server
  1. Start the MySQL service on Fedora with the following command:
shell> sudo service mysqld start
  1. Secure the MySQL installation with the following command:
shell> mysql_secure_installation
  1. Set the MySQL Service to start with the Fedora operating system with the following command (not chkconfig):
shell> sudo systemctl enable mysqld.service

It sets the following two links:

ln -s '/usr/lib/systemd/system/mysqld.service' '/etc/systemd/system/mysql.service'
ln -s '/usr/lib/systemd/system/mysqld.service' '/etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/mysqld.service'

Restart the Fedora operating system to effect the changes.

  1. Reset the MySQL configuration file to enable external connections through Port 3306 with the following changes to the my:

Remark out the socket line, like this:

#socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

Add the bind-address and port lines below after you know the actual IP address of the server to the my.cnf file in the /etc directory.

You substitute the actual IP address for the nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn on the bind_address line with the actual IP address returned by the ifconfig command, like this:

shell> ifconfig

Then, add these two lines to the my.cnf file.

bind-address=nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
port=3306

It’s actually easier to use localhost.localdomain than an IP address when you use DHCP, like:

bind-address=localhost.localdomain
port=3306

If you plan to connect from a host system, like Windows or Mac OS X, to a virtual Linux environment using DHCP, change localhost.localdomain to 0.0.0.0:

bind-address=0.0.0.0
port=3306
  1. Restart the mysqld service with the following syntax:
shell> sudo service mysqld restart

You can check whether MySQL is listening on Port 3306 with this syntax:

shell> sudo netstat –anp | grep 3306

It displays:

tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:3306          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1311/mysqld

Go to this page if you want to install MySQL Workbench.

Written by maclochlainn

January 7th, 2014 at 11:04 pm

Posted in Fedora,Linux,MySQL,VMWare

Tagged with , ,

Oracle Linux & VMWare Tools

without comments

Wow, I’ve been busy since OOW2011. This is the first post since I left for San Francisco. My Android phone got blown out by a forced upgrade and would only charge when actively connected across the USB to the computer. At the conference, my laptop was sidelined as a charger.

Anyway, I’m back working on virtual environments again. I found a couple slight variation installing VMWare Tools on Oracle Unbreakable Linux. Here are the post installation steps that I encountered, and the IP addresses are based on how VMWare configured DHCP, which is qualified in this older post.

  1. Navigate to the VMWare Menu, choose Virtual Machine and in the drop down menu Install VMWare Tools. This will mount a virtual CD in the Oracle Unbreakable Linux virtual machine and it launches the following dialog box:

  1. Open a terminal session by right clicking anywhere in the desktop, and then choose Open in Terminal from the context menu. You can then run the VMWare Toolkit by following these instructions:
cd /media/VMware\ Tools
cp VMwareTools-8.4.7-416484.tar.gz /tmp
cd /tmp
gunzip VMwareTools-8.4.7-416484.tar.gz
tar -xvf VMwareTools-8.4.7-416484.tar
cd vmware-tools-distrib
sudo ./vmware-install.pl

The last step requires that you reply to a set of prompts. If you’d like to accept the default at one time, you can use the following command:

sudo ./vmware-install.pl --default

You should most likely encounter an error like the following, which it appears you can ignore. If I find anything to the contrary, the post will be updated with findings.

(EE) Failed to load module "vmwgfx" (module does not exist, 0)
(EE) vmware: Please ignore the above warnings about not being able to load module/driver vmwgfx
(EE) open /dev/fb0: No such device
  1. In the terminal session you should configure three files to make sure your networking works. I found that the dialogs failed to set one key element, so it’s simply easier to do this manually. Rather than using sudo, you should open a root shell by doing:
su - root

Enter your user’s password:

Password:

You should use vi to edit and save the resolv.conf file with appropriate domain, search, and nameserver values. The values below work for VMWare when the gateway IP address is 172.16.123.2.

# Generated by NetworkManager
domain localdomain
search localdomain
nameserver 172.16.123.2

Using vi, edit the /etc/sysconfig/network file to include an appropriate gateway IP address, like so:

NETWORKING=yes
HOSTNAME=localhost.localdomain
GATEWAY=172.16.123.2

The last file to fix is /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file. This is the file that isn’t completely configured by the GUI component (it fails set the ONBOOT value to yes).

DEVICE=eth0
HWADDR=00:0c:29:31:ef:46
ONBOOT=yes
NM_CONTROLLED=yes
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
TYPE=Ethernet
DNS1=172.16.123.2
USERCTL=no
PEERDNS=yes
IPV6INIT=no

You reset networking with the following command:

/etc/rc.d/init.d/network restart

As always, I hope this helps a few folks.

Written by maclochlainn

October 19th, 2011 at 11:49 pm

Posted in Oracle Linux,VMWare

VMWare Fusion Permissions

with 3 comments

It’s always interesting when I have to sort out problems with VMWare Fusion on my Mac OS X. Right, as you guessed, interesting means frustrating. 😉 What started the whole thing was my investigating why VMWare networking would sometimes not start. I noticed the problem began after my upgrade to VMWare Fusion 3.1.0 (261058).

Rather than reboot the Mac OS X, which has fixed the problem, I tried to restart the service after closing my VMs. You can find how to do that in this older post of mine.

When I tried to restart it with the following command:

# sudo /Library/Application\ Support/VMware\ Fusion/boot.sh  --restart

I got the following error on VMWare file permissions:

VMware Fusion 261058: Shutting down VMware Fusion: 
Stopped DHCP service on vmnet1
Disabled hostonly virtual adapter on vmnet1
Stopped DHCP service on vmnet8
Stopped NAT service on vmnet8
Disabled hostonly virtual adapter on vmnet8
Stopped all configured services on all networks
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
(kernel) Kext com.vmware.kext.vmcrosstalk not found for unload request.
Failed to unload com.vmware.kext.vmcrosstalk - (libkern/kext) not found.
(kernel) Kext com.vmware.kext.vmmon not found for unload request.
Failed to unload com.vmware.kext.vmmon - (libkern/kext) not found.
 
VMware Fusion 261058: Starting VMware Fusion: 
2010-06-10 22:22:30.588 repair_packages[455:607] PackageKit: *** Missing bundle identifier: /Library/Receipts/vpn.pkg
Verifying files from package 'com.vmware.fusion.application' on '/'.
	Permissions differ on "Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/VMDKMounter.app/Contents/MacOS/vmware-vmdkMounter", should be -rwxr-xr-x , they are -rwsr-xr-x .
	Warning: SUID file 'Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/VMDKMounter.app/Contents/MacOS/vmware-vmdkMounter' has been modified and will not be repaired.
Finished verifying files from package 'com.vmware.fusion.application' on '/'.
Started network services
Verifying and re-installing files from /Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/thnuclnt

Navigating to the directory, an ls -al found the two files below and their respective permissions.

drwxr-xr-x  4 root  wheel      136 Jun 10 22:51 .
drwxr-xr-x  5 root  wheel      170 May 27 21:22 ..
-rwsr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  1593620 May 21 03:51 vmware-vmdkMounter
-rwsr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  1475396 May 21 03:51 vmware-vmdkMounterTool

I thought perhaps both files required the same permissions but I was wrong. If you change the permissions on the vmware-vmdkMounterTool file, you’ll raise an error telling you that it should be -rwsr-xr-x. If you make that same mistake too, I’ve got the reset syntax at the bottom of the post.

You should only change the file permissions of vmware-vmdkMounter file. The following syntax lets you remove the sticky bit from the user permissions but you’ll need the root password (the administrator password).

sudo chmod u=rwx,go=rx vmware-vmdkMounter

That should leave you with the following permissions:

drwxr-xr-x  4 root  wheel      136 Jun 10 22:51 .
drwxr-xr-x  5 root  wheel      170 May 27 21:22 ..
-rwxr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  1593620 May 21 03:51 vmware-vmdkMounter
-rwsr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  1475396 May 21 03:51 vmware-vmdkMounterTool

When you restart you should get the following pseudo clean output. Pseudo because apparently the two errors are not meaningful. At least, I couldn’t find anything on them and VMWare Fusion now works. I’ll probably investigate this a bit more later, and I’ll update anything in this post. If you know something, post it as a comment to help everybody.

VMware Fusion 261058: Shutting down VMware Fusion: 
Stopped DHCP service on vmnet1
Disabled hostonly virtual adapter on vmnet1
Stopped DHCP service on vmnet8
Stopped NAT service on vmnet8
Disabled hostonly virtual adapter on vmnet8
Stopped all configured services on all networks
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
No matching processes were found
(kernel) Kext com.vmware.kext.vmcrosstalk not found for unload request.
Failed to unload com.vmware.kext.vmcrosstalk - (libkern/kext) not found.
(kernel) Kext com.vmware.kext.vmmon not found for unload request.
Failed to unload com.vmware.kext.vmmon - (libkern/kext) not found.
 
VMware Fusion 261058: Starting VMware Fusion: 
2010-06-10 22:58:45.276 repair_packages[861:607] PackageKit: *** Missing bundle identifier: /Library/Receipts/vpn.pkg
Verifying files from package 'com.vmware.fusion.application' on '/'.
Finished verifying files from package 'com.vmware.fusion.application' on '/'.
Started network services
Verifying and re-installing files from /Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/thnuclnt

If you fat fingered the resetting command and also changed the vmware-vmdkMounterTool file permissions, you can reset them to shared user by using the following syntax:

sudo chmod u=rwxs,go=rx vmware-vmdkMounterTool

As always, I hope this helps others.

Written by maclochlainn

June 10th, 2010 at 11:28 pm

VMWare Fusion NAT

with 32 comments

This is to correct an earlier omission and provide instructions for configuring static and dynamic IP addresses for Virtual Machines runing on VMWare Fusion on Mac OS X. The benefit of static IP address is important for those installing multiple development and test instances of Oracle Databases in virtual environments.

Back in September 2008, I blogged about how to configure the Oracle Client 10g on Mac OS X. It’s been used a lot but in hindsight it could have been organized more effectively. One thing that I noticed (through somebody bringing it to my attention) is that explaining the VMWare Fusion component by itself would have been more helpful then listing the IP ranges for releases through the date of my post. Hopefully, this corrects that omission.

VMWare NAT Configuration

There are only a few steps that you must do. These are they:

  1. Read the subnet value from the dhcpd.conf file.
  2. Dynamic IP address only require you to set the guest operating system to DHCP.
  3. Static IP addresses require you to set the IP address, subnet, default gateway, and preferred DNS server.
  4. Add assigned IP address and the guest operating system hostname to your Mac OS X /etc/hosts file.

The next sections gives the details of where to find all the things that you may want to experiment with. Remember if you make an error that damages these configuration files, you have to fix it or re-install VMWare Fusion.

VMWare NAT Files and Configurations

You can find the IP ranges for the Network Address Translation (NAT) here in VMWare 3:

/Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/vmnet8/dhcpd.conf

VMWare 4 changes the location, qualified below.

You can find the IP ranges for the Network Address Translation (NAT) here in VMWare 3:

/Library/Preferences/VMware Fusion/vmnet8/dhcpd.conf

You can open the file for editing like this:

sudo vi "/Library/Application\ Support/VMware\ Fusion/vmnet8/dhcpd.conf"

The file contains the subnet, which I’ve found changes with release. You can configure this file and assign fixed addresses in it. However, you don’t need to install fixed addresses in this file unless you want to reserve addresses in the dynamic range.

The dynamic range is between xxx.xxx.xxx.128 and xxx.xxx.xxx.254. The range of xxx.xxx.xxx.3 to xxx.xxx.xxx.127 is available for static IP addresses. You can set a static IP address inside the native operating system of the VM.

The dhcpd.conf file with it’s instructions, looks like this:

# Configuration file for ISC 2.0 vmnet-dhcpd operating on vmnet8.
#
# This file was automatically generated by the VMware configuration program.
# See Instructions below if you want to modify it.
#
# We set domain-name-servers to make some DHCP clients happy
# (dhclient as configured in SuSE, TurboLinux, etc.).
# We also supply a domain name to make pump (Red Hat 6.x) happy.
#
 
###### VMNET DHCP Configuration. Start of "DO NOT MODIFY SECTION" #####
# Modification Instructions: This section of the configuration file contains
# information generated by the configuration program. Do not modify this
# section.
# You are free to modify everything else. Also, this section must start 
# on a new line 
# This file will get backed up with a different name in the same directory 
# if this section is edited and you try to configure DHCP again.
 
# Written at: 02/18/2010 23:30:54
allow unknown-clients;
default-lease-time 1800;                # default is 30 minutes
max-lease-time 7200;                    # default is 2 hours
 
subnet 172.16.123.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
	range 172.16.123.128 172.16.123.254;
	option broadcast-address 172.16.123.255;
	option domain-name-servers 172.16.123.2;
	option domain-name localdomain;
	default-lease-time 1800;                # default is 30 minutes
	max-lease-time 7200;                    # default is 2 hours
	option routers 172.16.123.2;
}
host vmnet8 {
	hardware ethernet 00:50:56:C0:00:08;
	fixed-address 172.16.123.1;
	option domain-name-servers 0.0.0.0;
	option domain-name "";
	option routers 0.0.0.0;
}
####### VMNET DHCP Configuration. End of "DO NOT MODIFY SECTION" #######

Unless you’ve changed the location of your VM repository on your Mac OS X, you can set a fixed-address for the virtual machine. You add the following lines at the bottom of the dhcpd.conf file:

host mclaughlinxp32 {
	hardware ethernet 00:0c:29:55:38:1b;
        fixed-address 172.16.123.21;
}

You pick whichever IP address you’d like to use. You also need to configure the guest opearting system in the VM with that same IP address. You can find the ethernet hardware value in the following file:

~/Documents/Virtual Machines/VMName/VMName.vmx

You can open the file and hunt for it, or simply run this command from the directory where the file exists:

grep ethernet0.generatedAddress *.vmx

As always, I hope this helps some folks.

Written by maclochlainn

March 1st, 2010 at 11:41 pm

Posted in Mac,Mac OS X,VMWare

What a VMWare Thrill …

with 2 comments

I’d upgraded from VMWare Fusion 2 to 3 and taken care of most instances. A NASTY surprise awaited me when I tried to upgrade my Linux installations this morning.

You MUST to uninstall VMWare tools from your repository of Linux operating systems before upgrading your VMWare Fusion or ESX server. If you don’t, you can’t access the console because the drivers make the console look like this:

Perhaps I missed this note when, as an early adopted I opted to move straight to VMWare Fusion 3. I would have complied with these instructions to avoid this headache.

All that’s required now, is that: (a) I export 500 GBs worth of virtual machines to another machine running VMWare Fusion 2; (b) Individually start each machine and run the uninstall VMWare Tools command individually; and, (c) Shutdown and reposition all virtual machines on the original server.

As stated in the note, the command to remove it is:

/usr/bin/vmware-tools-uninstall.pl

Click on the note in the event the link fails to resolve, which would mean the note vanishes into oblivion some day in the future …

While I’ve another machine that’s not yet upgraded, this is a major inconvenience. It’s a shame that the Linux components don’t install automatically. It’s a shame that the install didn’t say something like, “Don’t do this if you’ve Linux virtual machines, unless you’ve removed their VMWare Tools installation.”

Another word to the wise, you don’t get the Linux Tools automatically when you download the product. The software prompts you to download the additional components when you attempt to launch a Linux environment. A cruel irony since by the time you see the prompt, you can’t! This is a change from the prior upgrade process.

Yes, haste makes waste but now I know. In the future, treat all VMWare upgrades like those from Microsoft test, re-test, re-authenticate in a small way before upgrading. Do you think VMWare really want to send that message to its customer base?

I got back to this tonight, and thanks to Red Hat’s Session Manager I was able to fix the Red Hat VMs. Launching it, I simply switched to the Failsafe Terminal and ran the following command, as per the note:

# /usr/bin/vmware-uninstall.pl

After that, I rebooted. Then, installed (mounted the VMWare Tools disk) from the VMWare Fusion menu. Opening a terminal as root, I then re-installed and configured VMWare Fusion. Those are done. As more time allows, I’ll update about the others.

I’m now reconfiguring the network since the VMWare Fusion 2 bridged at a 172.16.153 subdomain and VMWare Fusion 3 bridges at a 172.16.123 subdomain.

Written by maclochlainn

February 6th, 2010 at 11:49 am

VMWare nabs me again …

with 7 comments

When I run into failures on VMWare Fusion, they’re always a bit tedious. This one happened on my iMac (OS X Leopard) running VMWare 2 (both constrained to old releases by university governance policies). The VM is Microsoft Vista in an IDE partition, it hung after running too long. I had to force quit the application. On reboot the socket file was still there, and it gave the following error message when trying to start it.

VMwarefusionvirtualdevice0

Here’s the error in plain text, so search engines can find it for others.

Virtual device serial0: File "/var/folders/Sf/SfvoJITAHMq1Vp8bNI7QZU+++TM/-Tmp-//vmware-mmclaugh/thnuclnt-641/socket" exists, but no server is listening to it.
 
There are three possible causes for this:
 - The server is alive but not ready yet, and you can retry later.
 - The server is busy communicating with another client, so you cannot run this client at the same time.
 - A previous server exited abruptly, and you can remove the file and try again.
 
The device will be disconnected.

How to fix it?

Delete the file, right? Yes, but there’s a trick. Navigating through the -Tmp- directory required a Unix shell trick because the - (dash) is a switch and backquoting it with a \ (backslash) didn’t work. Jeff Yoder, told me the trick to change directory into a dash leading directory name. It was this:

cd -- -Tmp-

The -- is how most shells mark the end of options to a command. After a -- all - (dashes) are treated as ordinary characters.

Mark Olaveson reminded me that using the present working directory before the directory name also worked. It demotes the dash to an ordinary character too.

cd ./-Tmp-

When I got to the directory, there was the socket file. I deleted it and everything worked like a charm.

srwxrwxrwx  1 mmclaugh  staff     0 Dec  8 13:04 socket

Written by maclochlainn

December 8th, 2009 at 3:43 pm

Windows 7 Static IP

with 127 comments

There are some subtle changes between Windows 7 and either Windows XP and Windows Vista. Since I use virtualization (with VMWare Fusion) extensively to test environments, I seem to go through this drill too often. By the way, I upgraded to VMWare Fusion 3 before testing the production releases of Windows 7.

The easiest Windows 7 installation uses DHCP. That’s what I did before patching the OS, installing virus protection software, and installing a few tools and program. Then, I change from a dynamic IP to static IP address and add a meaningful name to the C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts file. Here are the steps to set a static IP address on Windows 7:

WindowsControlPanel7

  1. Assuming that you’re in the Category view, you should navigate to the Control Panel, choose Network and Internet, and then click Network and Sharing Center. This is the window that you should see (click image to enlarge it):

NetworkSetup1

    Click the Local Area Connection to begin configuring your static IP address.

NetworkSetup2

  1. From the Local Area Connection Status window, click the Details button to see your existing connection details (most likely DHCP). If you’re running this in VMWare Fusion, the 172.16.153.129 is the first IP address allocated. You should note the default gateway and DNS server IP address, which should always be 172.16.153.2. Click the Close button when you’ve made note of those IP addresses for subsequent steps.

NetworkSetup3

  1. Back at the Local Area Connection Status window, click the Properties button. It will show you the Local Area Connection Properties dialog. Click on the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) in the item box of the dialog window.

NetworkSetup4

  1. Click the Use the following IP address radio button and enter the appropriate values for your static IP address. The default gateway and DNS server are generally different but are the same when you’re using NAT addressing inside VMWare.

NetworkSetup5

You should be completed now. If you test the connection, Windows 7 raises and error but everything works after you reboot the operating system.

Written by maclochlainn

November 26th, 2009 at 9:34 pm