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Bash Arrays & Oracle

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Last week, I wrote about how to use bash arrays and the MySQL database to create unit and integration test scripts. While the MySQL example was nice for some users, there were some others who wanted me to show how to write bash shell scripts for Oracle unit and integration testing. That’s what this blog post does.

If you don’t know much about bash shell, you should start with the prior post to learn about bash arrays, if-statements, and for-loops. In this blog post I only cover how to implement a bash shell script that runs SQL scripts in silent mode and then queries the database in silent mode and writes the output to an external file.

I’ve copied the basic ERD for the example because of a request from a reader. In their opinion it makes cross referencing the two posts unnecessary.

LittleERDModel

To run the bash shell script, you’ll need the following SQL files, which you can see by clicking not he title below. There are several differences. For example, Oracle doesn’t support a DROP IF EXISTS syntax and requires you to write anonymous blocks in their PL/SQL language; and you must explicitly issue a QUIT; statement even when running in silent mode unlike MySQL, which implicitly issues an exit.

If you don’t have a sample test schema to use to test this script, you can create a sample schema with the following create_user.sql file. The file depends on the existence of a users and temp tablespace.

Click the link below to see the source code for a script that let’s you create a sample user account as the system user:

The following list_oracle.sh shell script expects to receive the username, password, and fully qualified path in that specific order. The script names are entered manually in the array because this should be a unit test script.

This is an insecure version of the list_oracle.sh script because you provide the password on the command line. It’s better to provide the password as you run the script.

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#!/usr/bin/bash
 
# Assign user and password
username="${1}"
password="${2}"
directory="${3}"
 
echo "User name:" ${username}
echo "Password: " ${password}
echo "Directory:" ${directory}
 
# Define an array.
declare -a cmd
 
# Assign elements to an array.
cmd[0]="actor.sql"
cmd[1]="film.sql"
cmd[2]="movie.sql"
 
# Call the array elements.
for i in ${cmd[*]}; do
  sqlplus -s ${username}/${password} @${directory}/${i} > /dev/null
done
 
# Connect and pipe the query result minus errors and warnings to the while loop.
sqlplus -s ${username}/${password} @${directory}/tables.sql 2>/dev/null |
 
# Read through the piped result until it's empty.
while IFS='\n' read actor_name; do
  echo $actor_name
done
 
# Connect and pipe the query result minus errors and warnings to the while loop.
sqlplus -s ${username}/${password} @${directory}/result.sql 2>/dev/null |
 
# Read through the piped result until it's empty.
while IFS='\n' read actor_name; do
  echo $actor_name
done

The IFS (Internal Field Separator) works with whitespace by default. The IFS on lines 29 and 37 sets the IFS to a line return ('\n'). That’s the trick to display the data, and you can read more about the IFS in this question and answer post.

You can run the shell script with the following syntax:

./list_oracle.sh sample sample /home/student/Code/bash/oracle > output.txt

You can then display the results from the output.txt file with the following command:

cat output.txt command:

It will display the following output:

User name: sample
Password:  sample
Directory: /home/student/Code/bash/oracle
 
Table Name
------------------------------
MOVIE
FILM
ACTOR
 
Actors in Films
----------------------------------------
Chris Hemsworth, Thor
Chris Hemsworth, Thor: The Dark World
Chris Pine, Star Trek
Chris Pine, Star Trek into Darkness
Chris Pratt, Guardians of the Galaxy

As always, I hope this helps those looking for a solution.

Written by maclochlainn

May 21st, 2015 at 1:16 am

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