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SQL Server ODBC DSN

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You must install and then configure a Windows Data Source Name (DSN) for SQL Server’s ODBC before you can connect MySQL Workbench to a SQL Server and migrate data. If you fail to set it up, you can’t complete the first step of the MySQL Workbench migration wizard, as shown in the image to the right.

For MySQL readers, this was posted as part of a replicateable test case for Alfredo’s MySQL Workbench team. A Windows OS version of Bug 66516.

You configure a Windows Data Source Name (DSN) for Microsoft SQL Server 2012 after a successful installation (shown in this related blog post), by performing the following steps.

  1. You need to create a data source in the operating system. You should open the Control Panel and click on the Administrative Tools menu item to begin the installation of a new data source.

  1. Click the Data Sources (ODBC) menu item to start the process.

  1. This is where you add a new User Data Source. Click the Add button on the right of the dialog box.

  1. The Create New Data Source dialog box should show the SQL Server Native Client 11.0 that was installed when you installed the database. Click on it in the selection box, and then click the Finish button.

  1. The first dialog of the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server process presents the following dialog, which prompts you for a Data Source Name (DSN), a description, a target server. I’ve entered SQL Server ODBC as the DSN and description, and chosen the local database server. The local database server is the server running on the localhost machine. Click the Next button to continue the process.

  1. The second dialog of the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server process prompts with the following dialog, which lets you opt for integrated Windows authentication or user credential authentication. The easiest set up when you’re running a test case on a single instance selects integrated windows authentication. Click the Next button to continue the process.

  1. The third dialog of the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server process prompts with the following dialog, which lets you change the default database, attach a database filename, set ANSI rules, the application intent, and multi-subnet failover. The default options are selected in the dialog. Click the Next button to continue the process.

  1. The fourth dialog of the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server process prompts with the following dialog, which lets you change the language, encryption, character translation, regional settings, and long query execution. The default options are selected in the dialog. Click the Next button to continue the process.

  1. The next dialog displays the settings for the ODBC SQL Server Setup. You should always confirm that things work by clicking the Test Data Source button.

  1. The next dialog displays success when you made working choices and failure when something is misconfigured. Click the OK button to continue the process.

  1. The OK button concludes the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server process, and returns you to the list of valid ODBC Data Sources. Click the OK button to conclude the process.

Hopefully, this helps those learning how to set up Microsoft SQL Server to work with MySQL Workbench’s migration tool.

Written by maclochlainn

September 12th, 2012 at 1:24 am

4 Responses to 'SQL Server ODBC DSN'

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  1. Hello,

    Just to inform you that this post arrived in the Planet MySQL stream.
    To avoid this behavior, you can easily use categories in wordpress to declare your RSS feed in Planet MySQL.

    Ex : http://blog.xxx.fr/index.php/category/mysql/feed/

    And then only push your MySQL post on Planet MySQL.

    Thx
    Cédric

    Cédric

    12 Sep 12 at 7:01 am

  2. Cedric,
    Thanks. I’m OK with that for these two posts because they help others test the migration feature of MySQL Workbench. The MySQL Workbench blog didn’t have these steps available and they’re pre-requisites steps to learning how to use the migration feature.

    They were also necessary for Alfredo’s MySQL Workbench team to work on a replicateable Windows OS test case for Bug 66516.
    Michael

    maclochlainn

    12 Sep 12 at 8:20 am

  3. [...] configure a Windows DNS [...]

  4. [...] SQL Server DSN [...]

    Migrating data

    13 Sep 12 at 1:25 am

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