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APEX Create Table

without comments

The following walks you through how you sign on to a STUDENT Workspace with Oracle’s APEX product. It shows you how to create a new table with the Object Browser tool.

You can find instructions on how to create your own STUDENT Workspace in this blog post. Overall, Oracle APEX is a valuable tool to learn and master.

UseStudentAPEX01

  1. You start the process by accessing the Oracle Database 11g APEX, which you can access at http://localhost:8080/apex by default on the server. If you’ve got a static IP address for your instance, you can replace localhost with the IP address or hostname for the IP address.

    • Workspace: STUDENT
    • Username:  ADMIN
    • Password:  STUDENT

UseStudentAPEX02

  1. After you login to the STUDENT workspace, you have four options. They are the: Application Builder, SQL Workshop, Team Development, and Administration. You start the process by accessing the Oracle Database 11g APEX, which you can access at http://localhost:8080/apex by default on the server. If you’ve got a static IP address for your instance, you can replace localhost with the IP address or hostname for the IP address. Click on the Object Browser icon to proceed.

UseStudentAPEX02A

  1. Clicking the SQL Workshop icon takes you to the second level menu. You click the Object Browser icon to create a database object.

OracleAPEXCT01

  1. After clicking the Object Browser icon, you see the screen at the left. Click the Create button to create a table.

OracleAPEXCT02

  1. After clicking the Create button, you see the screen at the left. Click the type of database object that you want to create. In our case, we click the Table hypertext to start the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXCT03

  1. After clicking the Table hyperlink, you see the Create Table screen at the left. Enter the column names, choose their data types and set the scale and precision. You should also check the Not Null checkbox when you want a column to be mandatory. Click the Next button to continue the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXCT04

  1. After entering the column names, you should choose the data types, enter the scale and precision, and check the NOT NULL checkbox to make appropriate columns mandatory by applying NOT NULL database constraints. If you run out of entry rows, you can click the Add Column button to add new rows. Click the Next button to continue the create table workflow when you’ve defined the columns.

OracleAPEXCT05

  1. After defining the column names, you should choose whether the primary key will use a new sequence or an existing sequence. You also have the ability to not assign a primary key value or simply leave it unpopulated when inserting new rows. The example creates an IMAGE_PK primary key constraint on the IMAGE_ID column, and declares an IMAGE_SEQ sequence value. Click the Next button to continue the create table workflow when you’ve defined the primary key constraint and any new sequence value for the primary key column.

OracleAPEXCTFK1

  1. After defining the primary key constraint, you can define foreign key column constraints. You enter a foreign key constraint name, choose between a Disallow Delete, Cascade Delete, or Set Null on Delete rule, select the foreign key column, the foreign key’s referenced table and column. Click the Add button to continue the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXCTFK2

  1. After defining a foreign key constraint, you can see the constraint that you created. Then, you can define another foreign key column constraints. You repeat the steps from the prior steps to add another foreign key constraint. Click the Add button to create a second foreign key constraint and complete the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXCTFK3

  1. After defining a second foreign key constraint, you see the following two foreign key constraints. Click the Next button to complete the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXTCUK01

  1. After defining all the foreign key constraints, you can create check and unique constraints. You check a radio button for a check or unique constraint, and then you select the columns for the constraint’s key. Click the /Add button to create any check or unique constraints as part of the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXTCUK02

  1. After defining all check and unique key constraints, you can see them in the Constraints box. Click the Next button to complete the create table workflow.

OracleAPEXCTC01

  1. After defining all items about the table, you can see the SQL to create the IMAGE table and its constraints. You can copy the SQL into a file for later use when writing a re-runnable script. Click the Create button to complete the create table workflow and create the table.

     

    The following are the contents of the script for the actions you’ve defined:

    CREATE table "IMAGE" (
        "IMAGE_ID"         NUMBER NOT NULL,
        "FILE_NAME"        VARCHAR2(60) NOT NULL,
        "MIME_TYPE"        NUMBER NOT NULL,
        "ITEM_IMAGE"       BLOB,
        "CREATED_BY"       NUMBER NOT NULL,
        "CREATION_DATE"    DATE NOT NULL,
        "LAST_UPDATED_BY"  NUMBER NOT NULL,
        "LAST_UPDATE_DATE" DATE NOT NULL,
        constraint  "IMAGE_PK" primary key ("IMAGE_ID")
    )
    /
    
    CREATE sequence "IMAGE_SEQ" 
    /
    
    CREATE trigger "BI_IMAGE"  
      before insert on "IMAGE"              
      for each row 
    begin  
      if :NEW."IMAGE_ID" is null then
        select "IMAGE_SEQ".nextval into :NEW."IMAGE_ID" from dual;
      end if;
    end;
    /   
    
    ALTER TABLE "IMAGE" ADD CONSTRAINT "IMAGE_FK1" 
    FOREIGN KEY ("CREATED_BY")
    REFERENCES "SYSTEM_USER" ("SYSTEM_USER_ID")
    
    /
    ALTER TABLE "IMAGE" ADD CONSTRAINT "IMAGE_FK2" 
    FOREIGN KEY ("LAST_UPDATED_BY")
    REFERENCES "SYSTEM_USER" ("SYSTEM_USER_ID")
    
    /
    alter table "IMAGE" add
    constraint "IMAGE_UK1" 
    unique ("FILE_NAME","MIME_TYPE")
    /   
    

OracleAPEXTable

  1. After creating the table, trigger, sequence, and constraints, you can see the table definition. You also have the ability to modify the table. At this point, you can create another structure or you can click the Home or SQL Workshop menu choice.

As always, I hope this helps those looking to learn new things and approaches.

Written by maclochlainn

April 7th, 2015 at 10:21 pm

APEX SQL Query

without comments

The following walks through how you sign on to a STUDENT Workspace with Oracle’s APEX product and write and run free-form SQL statements. You can find instructions on how to create your own STUDENT Workspace.

While this blog introduces several concepts and features of Oracle APEX, it only focuses on how to write and run free-form SQL statements. Overall, Oracle APEX is a valuable tool to learn and master.

UseStudentAPEX01

  1. You start the process by accessing the Oracle Database 11g APEX, which you can access at http://localhost:8080/apex by default on the server. If you’ve got a static IP address for your instance, you can replace localhost with the IP address or hostname for the IP address.

    • Workspace: STUDENT
    • Username:  ADMIN
    • Password:  STUDENT

UseStudentAPEX02

  1. After you login to the STUDENT workspace, you have four options. They are the: Application Builder, SQL Workshop, Team Development, and Administration. You start the process by accessing the Oracle Database 11g APEX, which you can access at http://localhost:8080/apex by default on the server. If you’ve got a static IP address for your instance, you can replace localhost with the IP address or hostname for the IP address. Click on the SQL Workshop icon to proceed.

    • Application Builder: Let’s you build custom APEX applications.
    • SQL Workshop: Let’s you work with custom SQL, and APEX provides you with the following utilities:
      • Object Browser: Lets you create tables, views, and other objects.
      • SQL Commands: Lets you run individual SQL statements inside a browser window and returns results in the bottom pane.
      • SQL Scripts: Lets you create, upload, delete, and run scripts from the browser.
      • Query Builder: Lets you create free form queries that include joins between tables, but limits you to primary to foreign key table relationships. That means you can’t write range joins with a cross join and the BETWEEN operator and you can’t write self-joins.
      • Utilities: Lets you work with the Data Workshop (imports and exports data), Object Reports (a SQL report writer tool), Generate DDL (a tool that creates structures in the database), User Interface Defaults (coordinate data dictionary), Schema Comparison (a tool to compare similarities between schemas, About Database (the ability to connect as the database administrator), and Recycle Bin (dropped and purged structures).
    • Team Development: A project management tool.
    • Administration: Lets you manage database services, users and groups, monitor activities, and dashboards. You should note that the SQL query doesn’t have a semicolon like it would in a SQL*Plus environment. The Run button acts as the execution operator and effectively replaces the role of the semicolon, which traditionally executes a statement.

UseStudentAPEX02A

  1. Clicking the SQL Workshop icon takes you to the second level menu. You click the SQL Commands icon to enter a free-form SQL statement. Click on the SQL Commands icon to proceed.

UseStudentAPEX03

  1. The first text panel lets you enter free-form queries. The Autocommit checkbox is enabled, which means the result of INSERT and UPDATE statements are immediate and don’t require a COMMIT statement. The second text panel displays results from a query or acknowledgment of statement completion.

UseStudentAPEX04

  1. This screen shot shows a query in the first panel and the results of the query in the second panel.

As always, I hope this helps those looking to learn new things and approaches.

Written by maclochlainn

April 5th, 2015 at 4:36 pm

APEX Create Workspace

with 2 comments

In a prior post, I showed you how to access Oracle Database 11g XE APEX. This post shows you how to create a basic workspace against a student database (or, what Oracle lables a schema, which is synonymous with a database).

Oracle11gAPEX_01

  1. You start the process by accessing the Oracle Database 11g APEX, which you can access at http://localhost:8080/apex by default on the server. If you’ve got a static IP address for your instance, you can replace localhost with the IP address or hostname for the IP address.

    • Workspace: INTERNAL
    • Username:  ADMIN
    • Password:  installation_system_password

Oracle11gAPEX_02

  1. After logging into the Oracle Application Express (APEX) system, you see the Home page at the left. Click the Manage Workspace button on the Home page.

Oracle11gAPEX_03

  1. Manage Workspace Dialog: After clicking the Manage Workspace button on the Home page, you see four major options to manage workspaces. They are the Workspace Actions, Workspace Reports, Export Import, and Manage Applications. You want to click on the Create Workspace to create a new workspace.

Oracle11gAPEX_03A

  1. Identify Workspace Diaglog: Enter a Workspace Name and Workspace Description. Then, click on the Next button move forward in the workflow.

Oracle11gAPEX_04

  1. Create Workspace Dialog: You create a workspace, APEX presumes you want to create a new schema. That’s why the Re-use existing schema drop down chooses No by default. You enter the Schema Name as STUDENT, the Password for the STUDENT schema, and an initial Space Quota (MB) of 100. Then, click the Next button to continue.

Oracle11gAPEX_05

  1. Identify Schema Dialog: If the schema you chose exists, you get the correction dialog. You need to change the Re-use existing schema drop down from No to Yes. Then, click the Next button to continue.

Oracle11gAPEX_06

  1. Identify Administrator Dialog: Here you enter an Administrator Username, Password, First Name, Last Name, and email address. Then, click the Next button to continue.

Oracle11gAPEX_07

  1. Confirm Request Dialog: Here you review your entries and click the Confirm Request button to continue.

Oracle11gAPEX_08

  1. Success Confirmation Dialog: Here you click the Done Request button to continue.

As always, I hope this helps you learn how to create a workspace.

Written by maclochlainn

April 5th, 2015 at 1:38 am

Oracle 11g XE APEX

with one comment

The question for most new Oracle users is what’s Apex? They have a different question When they discover how to connect to the Oracle Database 11g XE default instance with this URL:

http://localhost:8080/apex

You’ll see the following web site, and wonder what do I enter for the Workspace, the Username, and the Password values?

Apex01

The answers are:

  • Default Workspace: INTERNAL
  • Default User: ADMIN
  • Default Password: SYS or SYSTEM Password from Install

Enter those values within the initial password time interval and you’ll arrive at the next screen where you can manage the Oracle Database 11g XE instance. If you wait too long, you’ll be redirected to enter the original SYS or SYSTEM password from install and a new password twice. The rules for a new password are:

  • Password must contain at least 6 characters.
  • New password must differ from old password by at least 2 characters.
  • Password must contain at least one numeric character (0123456789).
  • Password must contain at least one punctuation character (!”#$%&()“*+,-/:;<=>?_).
  • Password must contain at least one upper-case alphabetic character.
  • Password must not contain username.

Whether you go directly to the next screen or have to enter your a new password, you should see the following screen:

Apex02

You can find the default configuration for the installation with the following anonymous PL/SQL block:

DECLARE
  /* Declare variables. */
  lv_endpoint    NUMBER := 1;
  lv_host        VARCHAR2(80);
  lv_port        NUMBER;
  lv_protocol    NUMBER;
BEGIN
  /* Check for current XDB settings. */
  dbms_xdb.getlistenerendpoint( lv_endpoint
                              , lv_host
                              , lv_port
                              , lv_protocol );
 
  /* Print the values. */
  dbms_output.put_line('Endpoint: ['||lv_endpoint||']'||CHR(10)||
                       'Host:     ['||lv_host||']'||CHR(10)||
                       'Port:     ['||lv_port||']'||CHR(10)||
                       'Protocol: ['||lv_protocol||']');
END;
/

It should print the following:

Endpoint: [1]
Host:	  [localhost]
Port:	  [8080]
Protocol: [1]

This is a standalone configuration and you can’t connect to the XDB server from another machine. You can only connect from the local machine.

I hope this helps those trying to use the default Apex 4 installation provided as part of the Oracle Database 11g XE instance. You can read an older post of mine that shows you how to set up a basic Workspace, but after reflection I’ll write more about creating and managing workspaces.

Written by maclochlainn

April 2nd, 2015 at 1:18 am

Open Fedora Port 80

with 4 comments

After installing the LAMP stack on Fedora, you need to open port 80 in the Firewall to access the PHP programs on the Fedora instance from external servers. You can open a firewall port by launching the firewall-config application as the root user with the following syntax:

firewall-config

The firewall-config utility opens the following dialog:

FedoraFirewall1

Click on the Ports tab, and you’ll see the following:

FedoraFirewall2

Skip this step if you only want to set the runtime privilege to the port. Click on the Runtime tab and change it to Permanent if you want the port to be accessible when you reboot your OS.

FedoraFirewallPermanent

Click on Add button to add a port exception, and you’ll see the following:

FedoraFirewall3

Enter Port 80 for the Apache server unless you used a different value for the Apache server’s listener port. If you’re not sure open the /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf file and check for the following line (default value shown):

Listen 80

Click the OK button to set the port exception. Then, you can connect to the Linux machine with the IP address, a DNS name, or a name you resolve in your local hosts file, like:

http://192.168.2.1/query.php

You can find the IP address of your Fedora image by inspecting the /etc/hosts file or capture a DHCP assigned address with the following command as the root user (or with sudo as a valid sudoer user):

ifconfig -a

It should return the following image, which is based on the data stored in MySQL’s studentdb database, as qualified in yesterday’s blog post:

ExternalWebPage

I hope this helps those setting up a LAMP instance to work with the MySQL database.

Written by maclochlainn

March 29th, 2015 at 12:35 am

Filtering String Dates

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A question came up about how to verify dates from a string without throwing a casting error because of a non-conforming date. You can throw a number of exceptions, and I wrote a function to filter bad string formats like the DD-MON-RR or DD-MON-YYYY.

The first one is for a day between 1 and the last day of month, which is:

ORA-01847: day of month must be between 1 and last day of month

An incorrect string for a month, raises the following error:

ORA-01843: not a valid month

A date format mask longer than a DD-MON-RR or DD-MON-YYYY raises the following exception:

ORA-01830: date format picture ends before converting entire input string

The verify_date function checks for non-conforming DD-MON-RR and DD-MON-YYYY date masks, and substitutes a SYSDATE value for a bad date entry:

CREATE OR REPLACE
  FUNCTION verify_date
  ( pv_date_in  VARCHAR2) RETURN DATE IS
  /* Local return variable. */
  lv_date  DATE;
BEGIN
  /* Check for a DD-MON-RR or DD-MON-YYYY string. */
  IF REGEXP_LIKE(pv_date_in,'^[0-9]{2,}-[ADFJMNOS][ACEOPU][BCGLNPRTVY]-([0-9]{2,}|[0-9]{4,})$') THEN
    /* Case statement checks for 28 or 29, 30, or 31 day month. */
    CASE
      /* Valid 31 day month date value. */
      WHEN SUBSTR(pv_date_in,4,3) IN ('JAN','MAR','MAY','JUL','AUG','OCT','DEC') AND
           TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(pv_date_in,1,2)) BETWEEN 1 AND 31 THEN 
        lv_date := pv_date_in;
      /* Valid 30 day month date value. */
      WHEN SUBSTR(pv_date_in,4,3) IN ('APR','JUN','SEP','NOV') AND
           TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(pv_date_in,1,2)) BETWEEN 1 AND 30 THEN 
        lv_date := pv_date_in;
      /* Valid 28 or 29 day month date value. */
      WHEN SUBSTR(pv_date_in,4,3) = 'FEB' THEN
        /* Verify 2-digit or 4-digit year. */
        IF (LENGTH(pv_date_in) = 9 AND MOD(TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(pv_date_in,8,2)) + 2000,4) = 0 OR
            LENGTH(pv_date_in) = 11 AND MOD(TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(pv_date_in,8,4)),4) = 0) AND
            TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(pv_date_in,1,2)) BETWEEN 1 AND 29 THEN
          lv_date := pv_date_in;
        ELSE /* Not a leap year. */
          IF TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(pv_date_in,1,2)) BETWEEN 1 AND 28 THEN
            lv_date := pv_date_in;
          ELSE
            lv_date := SYSDATE;
          END IF;
        END IF;
      ELSE
        /* Assign a default date. */
        lv_date := SYSDATE;
    END CASE;
  ELSE
    /* Assign a default date. */
    lv_date := SYSDATE;
  END IF;
  /* Return date. */
  RETURN lv_date;
END;
/

You can check valid dates with a DD-MON-RR format:

SELECT verify_date('28-FEB-10') AS "Non-Leap Year"
,      verify_date('29-FEB-12') AS "Leap Year"
,      verify_date('31-MAR-14') AS "31-Day Year"
,      verify_date('30-APR-14') AS "30-Day Year"
FROM   dual;

You can check valid dates with a DD-MON-YYYY format:

SELECT verify_date('28-FEB-2010') AS "Non-Leap Year"
,      verify_date('29-FEB-2012') AS "Leap Year"
,      verify_date('31-MAR-2014') AS "31-Day Year"
,      verify_date('30-APR-2014') AS "30-Day Year"
FROM   dual;

They both return:

Non-Leap    Leap YEAR 31-DAY YEAR 30-DAY YEAR
----------- --------- ----------- -----------
28-FEB-10   29-FEB-12 31-MAR-14   30-APR-14

You can check badly formatted dates with the following query:

SELECT verify_date('28-FEB-2010') AS "Non-Leap Year"
,      verify_date('29-FEB-2012') AS "Leap Year"
,      verify_date('31-MAR-2014') AS "31-Day Year"
,      verify_date('30-APR-2014') AS "30-Day Year"
FROM   dual;

You can screen for an alphanumeric string with the following expression:

SELECT 'Valid alphanumeric string literal' AS "Statement"
FROM   dual
WHERE  REGEXP_LIKE('Some Mythical String $200','([:alnum:]|[:punct:]|[:space:])*');

You can screen for a numeric literal as a string with the following expression:

SELECT 'Valid numeric literal' AS "Statement"
FROM   dual
WHERE  REGEXP_LIKE('123.00','([:digit:]|[:punct:])');

As always, I hope this helps those who need this type of solution.

Written by maclochlainn

February 2nd, 2015 at 12:53 am

PL/SQL Fall Through?

with 2 comments

Somebody wants to know how you can write a PL/SQL solution that mimics the fall through of a switch statement because PL/SQL doesn’t support a switch statement (it does support a simple and searched CASE statement without fall through). It’s a question that I found interesting because there wasn’t a need for it when I figured out what he wanted to accomplish. Essentially, he wanted to know how to implement a nested loop where the first loop runs in ascending order and the nested loop runs in descending order based on the value of the outer loop.

While it seems Christmas songs aren’t politically correct, The Twelve Days of Christmas lets me show you how to implement a coupled nested loop. The easiest way to implement a solution requires an object type, like

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CREATE OR REPLACE
  TYPE lyric IS OBJECT
  ( day_name   VARCHAR2(8)
  , gift_name  VARCHAR2(24));
/

The following anonymous block program shows you how to couple the performance of nested loops to print the lyrics from two collections:

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DECLARE
  /* Declare an array of days and gifts. */
  TYPE days IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(8);
  TYPE gifts IS TABLE OF lyric;
 
  /* Initialize the collection of days. */                    
  lv_days DAYS := days( 'first', 'second', 'third', 'fourth'
                      , 'fifth', 'sixth', 'seventh', 'eighth'
                      , 'nineth', 'tenth', 'eleventh', 'twelfth');
 
  /* Initialize the collection of lyrics. */
  lv_gifts GIFTS := gifts( lyric('and a', 'Partridge in a Pear Tree')
                         , lyric('Two', 'Turtle Doves')
                         , lyric('Three', 'French Hens')
                         , lyric('Four', 'Calling Birds')
                         , lyric('Five', 'Golden Rings' )
                         , lyric('Six', 'Geese a Laying')
                         , lyric('Seven', 'Swans a Swimming')
                         , lyric('Eight', 'Maids a Milking')
                         , lyric('Nine', 'Maids a Milking')
                         , lyric('Ten', 'Lords a Leaping')
                         , lyric('Eleven', 'Pipers Piping')
                         , lyric('Twelve', 'Drummers Drumming'));
BEGIN
  /* Read forward through the days. */
  FOR i IN 1..lv_days.COUNT LOOP
    DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('On the ' || lv_days(i) || ' day of Christmas');
    DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('my true love sent to me:');
 
    /* Read backward through the lyrics based on the ascending value of the day. */   
    FOR j IN REVERSE 1..i LOOP
      IF i = 1 THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('-'||'A'||' '||lv_gifts(j).gift_name);
      ELSE
        DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('-'||lv_gifts(j).day_name||' '||lv_gifts(j).gift_name);
      END IF;
    END LOOP;
 
    /* A line break by verse. */
    DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line(CHR(10));
  END LOOP; 
END;
/

The FOR loop on line 31 descends from the current index of the ascending out loop. This shows you how to couple the performance of outer and inner loops. It let’s you print The Twelve Days of Christmas, as:

On the first day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-A Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the second day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the third day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the fourth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the fifth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the sixth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the seventh day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Seven Swans a Swimming
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the eighth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Eight Maids a Milking
-Seven Swans a Swimming
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the nineth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Nine Maids a Milking
-Eight Maids a Milking
-Seven Swans a Swimming
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the tenth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Ten Lords a Leaping
-Nine Maids a Milking
-Eight Maids a Milking
-Seven Swans a Swimming
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the eleventh day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Eleven Pipers Piping
-Ten Lords a Leaping
-Nine Maids a Milking
-Eight Maids a Milking
-Seven Swans a Swimming
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
 
 
On the twelfth day of Christmas
my true love sent to me:
-Twelve Drummers Drumming
-Eleven Pipers Piping
-Ten Lords a Leaping
-Nine Maids a Milking
-Eight Maids a Milking
-Seven Swans a Swimming
-Six Geese a Laying
-Five Golden Rings
-Four Calling Birds
-Three French Hens
-Two Turtle Doves
-and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

My conclusion is that the PL/SQL language doesn’t need to support fall through because it provides a simpler and more effective solution with coupled nested loops. As always, I hope the example helps those interested in a solution.

Written by maclochlainn

January 18th, 2015 at 12:13 am

Querying an Object Type

without comments

I demonstrated a number of SQL approaches to reading object types in Appendix B of the Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Programming book. For example, the easiest one to construct and return the results from a TO_STRING member function uses the TREAT function:

SELECT TREAT(base_t() AS base_t).to_string() AS "Text"
FROM   dual;

However, it seems that I could have provided one more. Here’s an example of how you can test the construction of an object type and how you can return its attributes with a query. It’s important to note that there’s a natural problem with this syntax when you increment a sequence inside the object type. The problem is that it double increments the counter for the sequence.

SELECT *
FROM   TABLE(SELECT CAST(COLLECT(base_t()) AS base_t_tab)
             FROM dual);

The syntax for the COLLECT function requires that you put it inside a SELECT-list. Then, the CAST function converts a single instance of the BASE_T object type to a one element BASE_T_TAB collection. Finally, the TABLE function returns a single row from the BASE_T_TAB collection.

You can find a more complete article covering column substitutability and object types and subtypes on the ToadWorld site. I think it helps clear up how you can effectively write PL/SQL types and subtypes for persistent object type columns.

Written by maclochlainn

November 25th, 2014 at 12:33 am

Finding Direct Indexes

without comments

If you’re not using Toad DBA Suite, it’s sometimes hard to find solutions. Somebody wanted to know how to find indexes that aren’t indirect. Indirect indexes are those created for a primary key because a primary key column or set of columns are both not null and uniquely constrained. Likewise, you create a unique index when you can create a unique constraint. You can’t drop a unique index for a primary key without dropping the primary key or unique constraint that indirectly created it.

The following query returns indexes with one or more columns that are created by a CREATE INDEX statement on a target table. It excludes unique indexes created by a primary key constraint, and it returns the relative position of columns in an index:

COLUMN sequence_name   FORMAT A22 HEADING "Sequence Name"
COLUMN column_position FORMAT 999 HEADING "Column|Position"
COLUMN column_name     FORMAT A22 HEADING "Column|Name"
SELECT   uin.index_name
,        uic.column_position
,        uic.column_name
FROM     user_indexes uin INNER JOIN user_ind_columns uic
ON       uin.index_name = uic.index_name
AND      uin.table_name = uic.table_name
WHERE    uin.table_name = UPPER('&&table_name')
AND NOT  uin.index_name IN (SELECT constraint_name
                            FROM   user_constraints
                            WHERE  table_name = UPPER('&&table_name'))
ORDER BY uin.index_name
,        uic.column_position;

It can be rewritten into a function, which can then drop indexes based on a table name:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION drop_indexes_on
( pv_table_name  VARCHAR2 ) RETURN NUMBER IS 
 
  /* A return value. */
  lv_return  NUMBER := 0;
 
  /* A query to return only directly created indexes. */
  CURSOR find_indexes_on
  ( cv_table_name  VARCHAR2 ) IS
    SELECT   DISTINCT ui.index_name
    FROM     user_indexes ui INNER JOIN user_ind_columns uic
    ON       ui.index_name = uic.index_name
    AND      ui.table_name = uic.table_name
    WHERE    ui.table_name = UPPER(cv_table_name)
    AND NOT  ui.index_name IN (SELECT constraint_name
                               FROM   user_constraints
                               WHERE  table_name = UPPER(cv_table_name));
 
  /* Declare function autonomous. */
  PRAGMA AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION;
 
BEGIN
 
  /* Drop the indexes on a table. */
  FOR i IN find_indexes_on(pv_table_name) LOOP
    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'DROP INDEX '||i.index_name;
    lv_return := 1;
  END LOOP;
 
  RETURN lv_return;
END drop_indexes_on;
/

You can call the drop_on_indexes_on function like this:

SELECT   drop_indexes_on(UPPER('address_lab'))
FROM     dual;

Hope this helps those who need to work with dropping indexes.

Written by maclochlainn

November 23rd, 2014 at 8:42 pm

Check Constraints

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Oracle Database 12c introduces a SEARCH_CONDITION_VC column to the CDB_, DBA_, ALL_, and USER_CONSTRAINTS views. The SEARCH_CONDITION_VC column is a VARCHAR2 data type equivalent to the search condition in the LONG data type SEARCH_CONDITION column. Unfortunately, Oracle Database 11g and earlier versions requires you to convert the LONG data type to a VARCHAR2 for the equivalent behavior. This post provides you with a function to help you do that in Oracle Database 11g.

While Oracle Database 12c let’s you check the search condition of a CHECK constraint, with this query:

SELECT   uc.constraint_name AS constraint_name
,	 uc.search_condition_vc AS search_condition
FROM     user_constraints uc
WHERE    uc.table_name = UPPER('table_name')
AND	 REGEXP_LIKE(uc.search_condition_vc,'search_key','i');

You need the following GET_SEARCH_CONDITION function to convert the SEARCH_CONDITION column from a LONG data type to a VARCHAR2 data type. It uses the DBMS_SQL package to convert the LONG data type.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_search_condition
( pv_table_name   VARCHAR2
, pv_column_name  VARCHAR2 )
RETURN VARCHAR2 AS
 
  /* Declare local variables. */
  lv_cursor           INTEGER := DBMS_SQL.open_cursor;
  lv_feedback         INTEGER;         -- Acknowledgement of dynamic execution
  lv_length           INTEGER;         -- Length of the input string
  lv_value_length     INTEGER;         -- Length of the output string
  lv_constraint_name  VARCHAR2(30);    -- Constraint name
  lv_return           VARCHAR2(32767); -- Function output
  lv_stmt             VARCHAR2(2000);  -- Dynamic SQL statement
  lv_long             LONG;            -- Dynamic LONG data type.
  lv_string           VARCHAR2(32760); -- Maximum length of LONG data type
 
  FUNCTION return_length 
  ( pv_table_name   VARCHAR2
  , pv_column_name  VARCHAR2 ) RETURN VARCHAR2 IS
 
    /* Declare a target variable,  because of the limit of SELECT-INTO. */
    lv_long_view  LONG;
 
    /* Declare a dynamic cursor. */
    CURSOR c
    ( cv_table_name   VARCHAR2
    , cv_column_name  VARCHAR2 ) IS
      SELECT   uc.search_condition
      FROM     user_constraints uc INNER JOIN user_cons_columns ucc
      ON       uc.table_name = ucc.table_name
      AND      uc.constraint_name = ucc.constraint_name
      WHERE    uc.table_name = UPPER(cv_table_name)
      AND      ucc.column_name = UPPER(cv_column_name)
      AND      uc.constraint_type = 'C';
 
  BEGIN
    /* Open, fetch, and close cursor to capture view text. */
    OPEN c (pv_table_name, pv_column_name);
    FETCH c INTO lv_long_view;
    CLOSE c;
 
    /* Return the output CLOB length value. */
    RETURN LENGTH(lv_long_view);
  END return_length;
 
BEGIN
 
  /* Get the length of the CLOB column value. */
  lv_length := return_length(pv_table_name, pv_column_name);
 
  /* Create dynamic statement. */
  lv_stmt := 'SELECT uc.search_condition'||CHR(10)
          || 'FROM   user_constraints uc INNER JOIN user_cons_columns ucc'||CHR(10)
          || 'ON     uc.table_name = ucc.table_name'||CHR(10)
          || 'AND    uc.constraint_name = ucc.constraint_name'||CHR(10)
          || 'WHERE  uc.table_name = UPPER('''||pv_table_name||''')'||CHR(10)
          || 'AND    ucc.column_name = UPPER('''||pv_column_name||''')'||CHR(10)
          || 'AND    uc.constraint_type = ''C''';
 
  /* Parse and define VARCHAR2 and LONG columns. */
  DBMS_SQL.parse(lv_cursor, lv_stmt, DBMS_SQL.native);
  DBMS_SQL.define_column_long(lv_cursor,1);
 
  /* Only attempt to process the return value when fetched. */
  IF DBMS_SQL.execute_and_fetch(lv_cursor) = 1 THEN
    DBMS_SQL.column_value_long(
        lv_cursor
      , 1
      , lv_length
      , 0
      , lv_string
      , lv_value_length);
  END IF;
 
  /* Check for an open cursor. */
  IF DBMS_SQL.is_open(lv_cursor) THEN
    DBMS_SQL.close_cursor(lv_cursor);
  END IF;
 
  /* Convert the long length string to a maximum size length. */
  lv_return := lv_string;
 
  RETURN lv_return;
END get_search_condition;
/

Then, you can use the following query to view the full search criteria of a CHECK constraint that matches part of a search string:

COLUMN constraint_name   FORMAT A16
COLUMN search_condition  FORMAT A30
SELECT   uc.constraint_name AS constraint_name
,        get_search_condition('table_name','column_name') AS search_condition
FROM     user_constraints uc
WHERE    REGEXP_LIKE(get_search_condition('table_name','column_name'),'check_constraint_search_string','i')
AND      uc.constraint_type = 'C';

Hope this helps those looking at discovering the full search criteria of a CHECK constraint.

Written by maclochlainn

October 21st, 2014 at 12:51 am